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Thread: OpenSUSE Looks To Switch To Btrfs For Next Release

  1. #1
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    Default OpenSUSE Looks To Switch To Btrfs For Next Release

    Phoronix: OpenSUSE Looks To Switch To Btrfs For Next Release

    With today's release of openSUSE 13.1 Beta has come some more interesting news about the future of the German-founded Linux distribution: they're hoping to switch to the next-generation Btrfs Linux file-system as their future default file-system...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ2NTY

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: OpenSUSE Looks To Switch To Btrfs For Next Release

    With today's release of openSUSE 13.1 Beta has come some more interesting news about the future of the German-founded Linux distribution: they're hoping to switch to the next-generation Btrfs Linux file-system as their future default file-system...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ2NTY
    OpenSUSE is not a conservative distribution...i hope they will aim for Wayland support in the next release as well along with btrfs.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonadow View Post
    OpenSUSE is not a conservative distribution...i hope they will aim for Wayland support in the next release as well along with btrfs.
    Actually openSUSE is usually conservative on their releases. They never make last minute changes to package versions on a planned release after the freeze date even though newer versions would appear before the goldmaster date. PulseAudio and systemd are an excellent examples of openSUSE's policy of not pushing "the new fad" until it matures. They will offer them as an optional install but stick to the tried and tested until their replacements are in good shape.

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    btrfs seems to be still unstable according to amount and severity of bugs reported to kernel bugzilla

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by JS987 View Post
    btrfs seems to be still unstable according to amount and severity of bugs reported to kernel bugzilla
    That needs much more data to assert. What bugs and is there any comparison with how other filesystems are doing?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RahulSundaram View Post
    That needs much more data to assert. What bugs and is there any comparison with how other filesystems are doing?
    Unexact comparison:
    bugs reported last 12 months according to https://bugzilla.kernel.org/query.cgi
    btrfs - 79
    ext4 - 26

  7. #7
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    Default Could eventually be the next distro for new users.

    OpenSuse has always had the potential to be the next big Linux distro due to its ease of installation and long term support. However, here is a small list of reasons why I passed over OpenSuse (it mostly had to do with the way their repositories are split up)


    • I get that Yast is different (and that's not a bad thing) but installing common applications that are needed right away is not a friendly way to teach new users how to add Yast repositories.
    • Installing a different version of KDE that didn't come with the installation requires to match up several repositoires. It isn't intuitive at all. Why would you want to only update KDE applications only when the next big point release has quite a number of Plasma Workspace fixes? Plus, it seems pointless now that Plasma 1 is in maintaince mode.
    • It seems that the rolling release is actually a repository that depends on a stable installation. Also, users need to reinstall properiary graphic drivers themselves if they use Tumbleweed (thankfully, I have Intel hardware).
    • The milestones releases works differently then most distros. They seem to contain their own repository and don't seem to update at all until the next milestone release. For instance, if one milestone comes out a week before a beta 2 version of some software comes out, you have to wait three weeks for the next milestone to come out in order to get it.


    If a user on this forum can explain what I did wrong or what I missed when it came to OpenSuse's repositories, I would really appreciate an answer. Also, I think that OpenSuse should come out with a true rolling release model to compete with the fact that Ubuntu is "always stable" at any point in its release now.
    Last edited by CTown; 09-19-2013 at 12:52 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CTown View Post
    OpenSuse has always had the potential to be the next big Linux distro due to its ease of installation and long term support. However, here is a small list of reasons why I passed over OpenSuse (it mostly had to do with the way their repositories are split up)


    • I get that Yast is different (and that's not a bad thing) but installing common applications that are needed right away is not a friendly way to teach new users how to add Yast repositories.
    • Installing a different version of KDE that didn't come with the installation requires to match up several repositoires. It isn't intuitive at all. Why would you want to only update KDE applications only when the next big point release has quite a number of Plasma Workspace fixes? Plus, it seems pointless now that Plasma 1 is in maintaince mode.
    • It seems that the rolling release is actually a repository that depends on a stable installation. Also, users need to reinstall properiary graphic drivers themselves if they use Tumbleweed (thankfully, I have Intel hardware).
    • The milestones releases works differently then most distros. They seem to contain their own repository and don't seem to update at all until the next milestone release. For instance, if one milestone comes out a week before a beta 2 version of some software comes out, you have to wait three weeks for the next milestone to come out in order to get it.


    If a user on this forum can explain what I did wrong or what I missed when it came to OpenSuse's repositories, I would really appreciate an answer. Also, I think that OpenSuse should come out with a true rolling release model to compete with the fact that Ubuntu is "always stable" at any point in its release now.
    I'm fairly new to Linux but I've ended up on Opensuse. I'd very much like to support a default distro. Ubuntu is clearly beyond the pale: Unity, Upstart, Mir plus the spy ware business. So I'm interested in your critique. Do you think Opensuse are open to reason? Opensuse seem to cut a good balance between Stability and cutting edge.
    Last edited by Rich Oliver; 09-19-2013 at 01:36 PM.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by JS987 View Post
    Unexact comparison: bugs reported last 12 months according to https://bugzilla.kernel.org/query.cgi btrfs - 79 ext4 - 26
    Well the feature set isn't comparable so a raw count doesn't mean much especially if you are just looking at bugs reported vs confirmed. Also most of the bugs are not reported in the kernel bugzilla anyway.

  10. #10
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    From linus' git, also known as 3.12-rc1+ (a version later than what OpenSuse is shipping):

    Btrfs is highly experimental, and THE DISK FORMAT IS NOT YET
    FINALIZED. You should say N here unless you are interested in
    testing Btrfs with non-critical data.
    Does that sound stable or finished to anyone?

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