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Thread: Preview: Ubuntu's Performance Over The Past Two Years

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by juanrga View Post
    I don't know any modern comparison with a binary distro. Some forums posters in the internet report about a 10% speed advantage, but fail to give any detail of what exactly compared and how. I have also seen the -Os/O2/O3 comparisons, but nothing about USE-flags
    The thing about comparing use-flags is that, first, there are too many variants, and second, it, by definition, means there is no feature parity when doing the comparison. Benchmarks are only extrapolated when there is feature parity. The point in use-flags is not loading things you don't use, and this is inherently a custom setting for a custom user, and thus not extrapolated. The closest you can get to actually make a valid comparison is stating you will always compare minimal features for a given package with default in another distro, with the same optimization flags (so to compare only the overhead introduced by features).

  2. #102
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    Thumbs up Good idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by mrugiero View Post
    The thing about comparing use-flags is that, first, there are too many variants, and second, it, by definition, means there is no feature parity when doing the comparison. Benchmarks are only extrapolated when there is feature parity. The point in use-flags is not loading things you don't use, and this is inherently a custom setting for a custom user, and thus not extrapolated. The closest you can get to actually make a valid comparison is stating you will always compare minimal features for a given package with default in another distro, with the same optimization flags (so to compare only the overhead introduced by features).
    Yes, I think you have to go this way.
    Going minimal may be the best choice.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by frign View Post
    I'm sure we need some real benchmarks to actually have a basis for argumentation.
    I don't think there is an _overall_ 10% speed advantage, but there's definitely even more in some areas.
    I agree benchmarks are needed. I would confess that less than a 10% disappoints me.

    Quote Originally Posted by mrugiero View Post
    The thing about comparing use-flags is that, first, there are too many variants, and second, it, by definition, means there is no feature parity when doing the comparison. Benchmarks are only extrapolated when there is feature parity. The point in use-flags is not loading things you don't use, and this is inherently a custom setting for a custom user, and thus not extrapolated. The closest you can get to actually make a valid comparison is stating you will always compare minimal features for a given package with default in another distro, with the same optimization flags (so to compare only the overhead introduced by features).
    Many benchmarks/reviews there out are not extrapolated to user specific hardware/software: different chipset, memory, disks, gpus, drivers, kernel, libs, and apps version can make differences in scores. However benchmarks/reviews are useful to get an idea.

    If it is possible to benchmarks three different kernels, or ten different OSs, or six different CPUs, why couldn't be benchmarked five different use-flags in the same system, just to see what happens? They would be useful to get an idea.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by juanrga View Post
    Many benchmarks/reviews there out are not extrapolated to user specific hardware/software: different chipset, memory, disks, gpus, drivers, kernel, libs, and apps version can make differences in scores. However benchmarks/reviews are useful to get an idea.

    If it is possible to benchmarks three different kernels, or ten different OSs, or six different CPUs, why couldn't be benchmarked five different use-flags in the same system, just to see what happens? They would be useful to get an idea.
    The point was that you have no way to tell what brought the improvement, or if any user will use that use-flags at all. You could do for many combinations, but that would make it harder to read and would take a lot more time. You can get the idea with the method I proposed, anyway.

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