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Thread: Preview: Ubuntu's Performance Over The Past Two Years

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  1. #1
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    Default Preview: Ubuntu's Performance Over The Past Two Years

    Phoronix: Preview: Ubuntu's Performance Over The Past Two Years

    Our latest look at the current development state of Ubuntu 13.10 is comparing the "Saucy Salamander" performance against that of Ubuntu 13.04, 12.10, 12.04.2 LTS, and 11.10. Testing was done with an Intel Sandy Bridge system to see how the Ubuntu Linux performance has evolved over the past two years in the road to the October release of Ubuntu 13.10.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=18912

  2. #2
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    Default

    Weird result for Lammps, according to previous benchmarks there should be little difference between GCC 4.7 and 4.8 http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...competes&num=2

    Same for Lavamd. http://openbenchmarking.org/prospect...5a1d98daedbbb7

  3. #3
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    Default ffmpeg

    Anyone knows why ffmpeg got so much faster in 13.10? Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    Is it just me or after the latest kernel update Ubuntu's fans spin at a lower rate? Did they merge the patch from 3.11 in 13.04?
    Radeon DPM was merged in 3.11, so if you're using radeon, that's probably normal. That is, if you use radeon.

  5. #5
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    Cool Gentoo

    And now compare it with Gentoo ...

    Ubuntu may have become faster, but it is still horrible bloatware.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by frign View Post
    And now compare it with Gentoo ...

    Ubuntu may have become faster, but it is still horrible bloatware.
    And then compare it with Ubuntu. Gentoo may be faster, but it is still a horrible desktop for any end-user. So?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by frign View Post
    And now compare it with Gentoo ...

    Ubuntu may have become faster, but it is still horrible bloatware.
    I am interested in Gentoo, but I couldn't find benchmarks comparing it to recent versions of binary-based distros as Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora...

    Do you know how many performance you get from going from a generic AMD_64 to compiling with optimizations? The own Gentoo site recommend the distro for owners of 8-cores, but does not give any detail on why.

  8. #8
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    Talking Go for it!

    Quote Originally Posted by juanrga View Post
    I am interested in Gentoo, but I couldn't find benchmarks comparing it to recent versions of binary-based distros as Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora...

    Do you know how many performance you get from going from a generic AMD_64 to compiling with optimizations? The own Gentoo site recommend the distro for owners of 8-cores, but does not give any detail on why.
    You should really go for it! I started with Gentoo in December with a quad-core Mac mini, which literally is an 8-core machine when hyperthreading is activated. But normally, you could use Gentoo with a single-core machine, as compiling doesn't need to be supervised. For very large programs, binary-versions are available in case of problems.

    Installing it for the first time is a _real_ challenge. I don't want to talk it down in any way: My first installation took over 8 hours and additional setup took days, but it was definitely worth it.
    You can't compare it to normal GNU/Linux-distributions: My system boots in 3 seconds and you can literally tweak anything.

    It's not about extreme compiler-flags (optimizations and the like), but more about what you compile into your software (shared libraries, generally speaking: dependencies).
    If you use a binary distribution and install GIMP for instance, it pulls everything in. Support for udev, image-libraries, acl's and stuff.
    You don't need most of it and compiling your own version of a given program can definitely yield positive results in regard to memory-consumption, performance and startup-speed.
    Added to this come a tremendous package manager (portage), a great documentation and an awesome community.

    I reinstalled Gentoo a few months ago (don't get me wrong, one setup can be literally used for decades) and knew a lot about the system by then. I was finished pretty quickly, as I could easily move all relevant configuration-files to the new setup.

    All in all, the steep learning-curve is worth it. Go for it!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by juanrga View Post
    I am interested in Gentoo, but I couldn't find benchmarks comparing it to recent versions of binary-based distros as Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora...
    Do you know how many performance you get from going from a generic AMD_64 to compiling with optimizations? The own Gentoo site recommend the distro for owners of 8-cores, but does not give any detail on why.
    There will be no/small difference in 90% cases. There are some benchmark results on Phoronix like these:
    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...izations&num=2
    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...cc_48_og&num=2
    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ore_avx2&num=2
    Last edited by JS987; 07-14-2013 at 09:27 AM.

  10. #10
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    Cool Trolling as usual

    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    Nobody with a life uses it and you know it. Nobody spends time compiling their own shit. Canonical got this. Now it's time for you to get it. And leave the basement. We want things to work out of the box without doing anything.
    BO$$, nice to see you again!

    Gentoo is a mixed bag for most people, but I freaking love it. It sure takes a lot of time to get used to, but when you are, for instance, a scientist, developer or server-administrator, being flexible and performance is the priority.
    Portage is awesome and way more advanced than aptitude. Using Debian once in a while, I feel like being set back _years_.

    Compiling your own stuff is also debatable, as it depends on what you do with the given potential. I know that excessive CFLAGS (-Ofast ...) don't bring much and make the program really unstable. What it's about is the fact that you have USE-flags to only compile your software with features you need. This effectively allows you to strip down your system, make your programs faster and reducing memory-usage (as less shared libraries are loaded).

    Once you have set up your Gentoo-system, it will be the bomb and work for you just like you want it to be. I am not unrealistic to say that Gentoo is for everybody. If you don't understand it or are incapable of reading the great manuals, then I can't help you, but I won't accuse you for using the bloatware Ubuntu. I don't want to push this discussion here too far, either, as I was speaking of performance and not user-friendliness.
    No one can debate that Gentoo is faster, and it's not about excessive compiler-flags and the like. It's more about what software is installed and how many dependencies it pulls in.

    I like your analogy of "getting out of the basement".
    Frankly, the question to ask is, who really is residing in a basement: The troll, who has nothing better to do than writing useless posts, or the experienced Gentoo user, who knows his way around GNU/Linux.


    I'll leave the answer to you, BO$$.
    Last edited by frign; 07-12-2013 at 10:47 AM.

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