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Thread: Mir Still Causing Concerns By Ubuntu Derivatives

  1. #11

  2. #12
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    Porting kde to use mir unofficially would be a totally pointless maintenance burden for the kubuntu team, its really not a viable option...

    There's no reason that they can't just use X or wayland. Packaging upstream software is a lot easier than maintaining a bunch of kde mir patches...
    Last edited by bwat47; 06-14-2013 at 08:54 PM.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwat47 View Post
    Porting kde to use mir unofficially would be a totally pointless maintenance burden for the kubuntu team, its really not a viable option...

    There's no reason that they can't just use X or wayland. Packaging upstream software is a lot easier than maintaining a bunch of kde mir patches...
    I agree. I do not understand the direction taken by the discussion on the mailing list.
    Canonical was never interested in KDE. It is a good opportunity to do something new that does not depend at all from Canonical/Ubuntu. BlueSystems is sponsoring many KDE projects, and Martin Grlin works for them. I think BlueSystems is the way to go.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    KDE will not support Mir as long as it remains a one-distribution solution.
    Count Kubuntu as 2nd distribution, and there you go, problem solved. And send another box of Preparation H to the KDE guys.

  5. #15
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    Xorg is still going to be available........Why can't they just keep using it until wayland is ready, or Mir gets kde support. Its not rocket science folks.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by YAFU View Post
    My vote is for the whole Kubuntu team effort focusing on keeping Netrunner as the only distribution by Blue Systems. Making Netrunner derived directly from Debian instead of Ubuntu, and use Wayland. BlueSystems could provide the equipment/infrastructure for packaging and for repositories.
    Sounds more like supporting Tanglu directly.

  7. #17
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    Apr 2013
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    Default X

    continue with X like redhat and others wants.

    the only derivates who really matters are mint, zorin and lubuntu the others are dead. if ubuntu 14.04 with mir is good lot of people who use zorin or mint will use ubuntu mir without problems. linux mint really have a headache with mir but they resolve the gnome 3 problem, we need to wait and see.

    kubuntu is one of worst kde distro opensuse, archlinux (with kde ofc),mageia are a lot better.

  8. #18
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    Dec 2011
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    Default Goodbye Ubuntu/Lubuntu, I switched back to Debian

    When Ubuntu first went with this Unity thing, I did give it a try but wasn't all that impressed. No matter, there was always Xubuntu and Lubuntu. I finally settled on Lubuntu, and used it for about three years. I didn't feel that Unity was hurting Ubuntu all that much, because it's use was optional. Even if it is the default, you aren't forced to use it, so it's no big deal.

    But this Mir thing is different. It really is an Ubuntu-only project, and you won't have the option to switch to Wayland with a few mouse clicks or command line tricks. This threatens to fragment Linux on the desktop. I wish that Mark Shuttleworth would at least explain just WHY he thinks Mir is so much better than Wayland. To date, all I've read in his interviews is that he brushes off any criticism of Mir and pretends there is no issue here. He's trashing Canonical's relationship with the developer community, and I don't understand how this benefits him, or anyone else.

    So I finally decided to go back to my roots, Debian. Running Debian Sid now. More specifically, the Siduction distro, LXDE spin. Other spins include Gnome, KDE, Razor-QT and XFCE. Loving it so far. I'll be looking forward to Wayland on Debian.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candide View Post
    When Ubuntu first went with this Unity thing, I did give it a try but wasn't all that impressed. No matter, there was always Xubuntu and Lubuntu. I finally settled on Lubuntu, and used it for about three years. I didn't feel that Unity was hurting Ubuntu all that much, because it's use was optional. Even if it is the default, you aren't forced to use it, so it's no big deal.

    But this Mir thing is different. It really is an Ubuntu-only project, and you won't have the option to switch to Wayland with a few mouse clicks or command line tricks. This threatens to fragment Linux on the desktop. I wish that Mark Shuttleworth would at least explain just WHY he thinks Mir is so much better than Wayland. To date, all I've read in his interviews is that he brushes off any criticism of Mir and pretends there is no issue here. He's trashing Canonical's relationship with the developer community, and I don't understand how this benefits him, or anyone else.

    So I finally decided to go back to my roots, Debian. Running Debian Sid now. More specifically, the Siduction distro, LXDE spin. Other spins include Gnome, KDE, Razor-QT and XFCE. Loving it so far. I'll be looking forward to Wayland on Debian.
    I don't see how offering an additional choice of software fragments the 'Linux community' any more than it already is.
    Choice is good, removing the option of choice from the users and developers is a sure fire way to start limiting Linux as a whole and sending it down the path of Android as a packaged solution aimed towards a strict set of purposes.
    Sure, Ubuntu is aiming to do this on their desktop, mobile and convergence platforms but that's the market they're aiming for and they've decided that Mir was a better way of delivering that vision. I would have hoped that since it was a FOSS project that the community response would have been better, but alas that is simply not enough these days.
    On a side note I like Debian as a stable server platform, but it has given me too many gripes in the past with binary drivers and other non-FOSS software for me to consider installing it in a desktop role.

  10. #20
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    Aug 2009
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    I don't think this is much an issue, as long as Ubuntu is still based on Debian, it should include its packages in their repositories, and that means Wayland and Xorg should remain there. Since the community derivatives choose which packages to use, they can ignore Mir completely.

    If on the other hand they remove critical packages (such as wayland), then i suppose community distros will base themselves on Debian and recreate what they need, or use Ubuntu repositories and add the missing packages in their own repository (Mint/Bodhi style).

    So there is nothing to worry about. Perhaps losing the "*buntu" from their name might make sense for some.

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