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Thread: Hot Relocation HDD To SSD Support For Btrfs

  1. #1
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    Default Hot Relocation HDD To SSD Support For Btrfs

    Phoronix: Hot Relocation HDD To SSD Support For Btrfs

    In working to enhance the performance of the Btrfs file-system in cases where certain data/files are frequently used, a set of patches for providing hot relocation support has been posted...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM3Njg

  2. #2
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    Is this similar to Apples Fusion Drive, whereby the capacity of the HDD and SSD are additive rather than the SSD just purely being a cache? Is there any particular reason this work is specific to btrfs and not compatible with other file systems?

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    Quote Originally Posted by gigaplex View Post
    Is this similar to Apples Fusion Drive, whereby the capacity of the HDD and SSD are additive rather than the SSD just purely being a cache? Is there any particular reason this work is specific to btrfs and not compatible with other file systems?
    That sounds like Intel's Rapid Storage technology for Windows?

    Also I read that Windows has a different way of doing something like that where commonly used files that do not reside on the SSD have their preferences and indexes stored on the SSD instead to speed up retrieval...or something along those lines.

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    Hybrid HDD/SSD disks and relocation is just for crappy OEM-computers, or people too poor to afford real solid-state disks.

    If you have two disks, this is kinda useless anyways;
    Just put the operating system on your SSD,
    then put all your movies and music on the HDD.

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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Hybrid HDD/SSD disks and relocation is just for crappy OEM-computers, or people too poor to afford real solid-state disks.

    If you have two disks, this is kinda useless anyways;
    Just put the operating system on your SSD,
    then put all your movies and music on the HDD.
    and put your steam folder on... hum, not enough space on the SSD for all games? too bad for you.
    Keep in mind that you are not representative of each and every linux use case in the world.

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    when will btrfs be ready ? so distros can migrate to it

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    Quote Originally Posted by madjr View Post
    when will btrfs be ready ? so distros can migrate to it
    Whenever distros decide to migrate to it. There will never be an official "it's now stable" point, because it's a gradual process.

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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Hybrid HDD/SSD disks and relocation is just for crappy OEM-computers, or people too poor to afford real solid-state disks.

    If you have two disks, this is kinda useless anyways;
    Just put the operating system on your SSD,
    then put all your movies and music on the HDD.
    And what for business with huge storage, which is what Btrfs is aiming at.

    Should they buy 8TB in SSD? Don't think so.

    Everyone isn't just using their computers to play games and watch porn.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by madjr View Post
    when will btrfs be ready ? so distros can migrate to it
    From the BTRS wiki....

    Quote Originally Posted by https://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/FAQ#Is_btrfs_stable.3F
    Is btrfs stable?

    Short answer: No, it's still considered experimental.

    Long answer: Nobody is going to magically stick a label on the btrfs code and say "yes, this is now stable and bug-free". Different people have different concepts of stability: a home user who wants to keep their ripped CDs on it will have a different requirement for stability than a large financial institution running their trading system on it. If you are concerned about stability in commercial production use, you should test btrfs on a testbed system under production workloads to see if it will do what you want of it. In any case, you should join the mailing list (and hang out in IRC) and read through problem reports and follow them to their conclusion to give yourself a good idea of the types of issues that come up, and the degree to which they can be dealt with. Whatever you do, we recommend keeping good, tested, off-system (and off-site) backups.

    Pragmatic answer: (2012-12-19) Many of the developers and testers run btrfs as their primary filesystem for day-to-day usage, or with various forms of "real" data. With reliable hardware and up-to-date kernels, we see very few unrecoverable problems showing up. As always, keep backups, test them, and be prepared to use them.
    Personal experience? From using it since it was first available in Fedora and Arch... Yes. I'm using it right now on my laptop and combining Btrfs with compress=lzo,ssd,discard and using the deadline I/O scheduler...its fast. Its stable, and compress is really nice since my SSD is only a 128Gb drive. I also used it on my home server because that machine had 2 drives in it, and btrfs was really nice there because RAID is built in. All you have to do is "mkfs.btrfs /dev/sda1 /dev/sdb1" and it will automatically spread hte filesystem across both drives, no messing around with LVM. I had zero problems with it there.

    Early Btrfs code? It was prone to error and bugs and corruption-- most of those, if not all of those, have been worked out now if you are using a recent kernel (seriously, dont use BTRFS on Ubuntu and then complain about it... try it on Arch or Gentoo or Fedora--somewhere where you have a RECENT kernel, and then see if its stable and good for your uses). I've had one filesystem corruption issue on a recent kernel and that was on Fedora 18 Beta because the laptop's battery died during the initial update. I could've tried to fix it with btrfsck, but since I had JUST Installed it i figured "Screw it" and just redid the install. After that it worked perfectly fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by erendorn View Post
    and put your steam folder on... hum, not enough space on the SSD for all games? too bad for you.
    Keep in mind that you are not representative of each and every linux use case in the world.
    Just map ~/.steam/ or whatever to /media/hdd/Steam/ with symlink (symbolic link) using the 'ln -s' command.

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