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Thread: HGST Travelstar 7K1000 2.5-Inch 1TB SATA 3.0 HDD

  1. #1
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    Jan 2007
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    Default HGST Travelstar 7K1000 2.5-Inch 1TB SATA 3.0 HDD

    Phoronix: HGST Travelstar 7K1000 2.5-Inch 1TB SATA 3.0 HDD

    Being benchmarked today at Phoronix under Linux is the HGST Travelstar 7K1000 1000GB 7200RPM Serial ATA 3.0 2.5-inch internal HDD.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=20307

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Michael,

    Thanks for the test, i was curious about that drive...but i'm even more curious about the Samsung M9T 2TB 2.5" drive.

    It's a standard 9.5mm thick drive....we can't buy it standalone, we have to buy the Seagate Backup Plus Slim 2TB (code STDR2000100 if case is in black color) and brake the case and get out the HDD...lot's of videos in YT about it.

    I'm very curious about that drive under LINUX.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Outthere, NSW, Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by AJSB View Post
    Michael,

    Thanks for the test, i was curious about that drive...but i'm even more curious about the Samsung M9T 2TB 2.5" drive.

    It's a standard 9.5mm thick drive....we can't buy it standalone, we have to buy the Seagate Backup Plus Slim 2TB (code STDR2000100 if case is in black color) and brake the case and get out the HDD...lot's of videos in YT about it.

    I'm very curious about that drive under LINUX.
    Wow, I'm in the market for 'down-sizing' ALL of my equipment to all this lovely small-form factor format. And now the lappy drives are coming out in good sizes, this is just tickling my fancy! I can replace all my 88mm (3.5" =D ) storage drives now with something disgustingly small and low powered AND easily transportable. Cant lose!

    Just seen a bunch of them on the market starting from AU$125 for an ADATA 2TB unit. The enclosed units, as you say, are definately cheaper. Well, you cant even get individual 2TB units seperate yet? I guess they just buy up all the 2TB's production runs before they're even built which seemingly helps keep the overrall cost down for us brave enough to break stuff.

    I'm certainly not complaining. I can probably use the cases for old SATA 2.5" discs (or adapt the SATA=>USB module for some fun purposes).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    328

    Default PCB quality suxx.

    Got one of these. And rather dissatisfied with PCB quality. As you can see on photo, its not gold-plated in many places (or plating is so bad its nearly invisible/haves no effect). Sure, mfr saved few cents on thin gold plating. But this means PCB can die in year or two due to contact loss caused by cuprum oxide on copper PCB areas. This is very common failire mode for modern HDDs and unfortunately Hitachi known for their quality now seems to adopt economy models of other vendors at cost of reliability of their HDDs. So if you about to use such HDDs, BACKUP YOUR DATA.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0xBADCODE View Post
    Got one of these. And rather dissatisfied with PCB quality. As you can see on photo, its not gold-plated in many places (or plating is so bad its nearly invisible/haves no effect). Sure, mfr saved few cents on thin gold plating. But this means PCB can die in year or two due to contact loss caused by cuprum oxide on copper PCB areas. This is very common failire mode for modern HDDs and unfortunately Hitachi known for their quality now seems to adopt economy models of other vendors at cost of reliability of their HDDs. So if you about to use such HDDs, BACKUP YOUR DATA.
    Could you do something crazy like apply a thin coating of thermal paste over the contacts to reduce the speed of oxidisation?

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