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Thread: Probable reason why coolbits was stripped from Nvidia Linux driver found ?

  1. #1
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    Default Probable reason why coolbits was stripped from Nvidia Linux driver found ?

    The answer is "Green Light". Link.

    So they disable Linux overclocking and punish card OEMs to not implement any overclocking by any mean, exactly to have less chip failures in desktop area(and less RMAs/replacementS), so they can sell those chips MUCH more profitable in Quadro/Tesla area, instead of desktop (giveaway).

    What backs up this claim, is the fact that coolbits disappeared exactly for Fermi and Kepler chips, exactly when this program was initiated.

  2. #2
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    While interesting on its own, tying it to Fermi Coolbits on Linux is a bit far-fetched. I do value a good conspiracy theory, but given the low marketshare of Linux, and the low % of linux users that would overclock their Geforces, the amount of RMAs saved by that move is tiny.

    As it's still available in Windows, I'd lean more towards the official explanation: power logic got much more complicated in Fermi, and they don't want to dedicate resources to making it work on linux. How boring, eh

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    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    While interesting on its own, tying it to Fermi Coolbits on Linux is a bit far-fetched. I do value a good conspiracy theory, but given the low marketshare of Linux, and the low % of linux users that would overclock their Geforces, the amount of RMAs saved by that move is tiny.

    As it's still available in Windows, I'd lean more towards the official explanation: power logic got much more complicated in Fermi, and they don't want to dedicate resources to making it work on linux. How boring, eh
    No, curaga. Green light is not "conspiracy theory", its actual project. If you read the article you will find references to EVGA posts from manager as well as responses.

    Nvidia does not want it cards to be overclocked, those who do - can't RMA it. This is fact.
    This means, that Nvidia is not obligated to pull a chip out of workstation market (Quadro, Tesla) to create a desktop replacement for burned RMAed chip.
    Each Quadro/Tesla card costs x10-1000 much money than desktop card. So Nvidia is maximizing its profit.

    Nvidia prohibits its OEM partners to add any hardware overclocking and introduces penalty to those who resist. Another fact.
    Even if OEM uses "void warranty and get ability to overclock card", he still receives nvidia penalty.
    Reasons see above.

    Nvidia Linux driver is simply "official nvidia" driver, so they simply pulled the overclocking support out.

    Why the whole issue - because 28nm chips are very hard to get currently, their amount is limited.

    Of course, for the end user, this is very very incomfortable.

    It is also anti-competitive, because IF nvidia would allow overclocking as it was (and as it is with AMD), this would mean that they have to count-in the upcoming RMAs, count-in the lost profits(see above), this would require them to include insurance percentage into desktop card cost. This would lead to price growth for top-line nvidia desktop cards. So, they push this strategy instead, to make cards cheaper and attack AMD further on price level, while minimizing RMA quote.

    My thinking is, due to absence of better proven/realistic theories, this is the best bet. So I published it.

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    I mean that tying GreenLight to Linux coolbits was the conspiracy theory - GreenLight by itself, as a program to push card OEMs around, certainly exists.

    Nvidia Linux driver is simply "official nvidia" driver, so they simply pulled the overclocking support out.
    My understanding was that nothing was pulled, overclocking for pre-fermi cards still works.

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    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    I mean that tying GreenLight to Linux coolbits was the conspiracy theory - GreenLight by itself, as a program to push card OEMs around, certainly exists.
    My understanding was that nothing was pulled, overclocking for pre-fermi cards still works.
    Ah, ok. I think here they cut it just because its "official" and "no one should resist". Chopping overclocking all way down, hardware, and still most wide area (win***s) would probably be too much, so they decided to keep it at least there. In this matter, true, my speculations...

  6. #6
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    Greenlight program does not prohibit overclocking itself. It forces AIB:s not to allow voltages over specs given by nvidia.

    And I don't think that nvidia itself makes overclocking softwares even for windows anymore; latest ntune was 2007(correct me if I'm wrong). Afterburner is msis(Unwinder), precision X is evgas(Unwinder) and palit have vtune. Evga has responded here:
    http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.aspx?m=138842&mpage=1

    Even tough nvidias linux driver shares same codebase than their windows cousin, there is some differences which makes simply porting impossible.

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