Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Linux x32 Is Made Easier With Ubuntu 13.04

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    14,901

    Default Linux x32 Is Made Easier With Ubuntu 13.04

    Phoronix: Linux x32 Is Made Easier With Ubuntu 13.04

    While there isn't yet a release yet of Ubuntu in the Linux x32 ABI flavor, some packages now found in Ubuntu 13.04 make it easier to setup this binary interface that brings some 64-bit advantages to the 32-bit world...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM1OTA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Sounds cool Michael, excited to see the result.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Posts
    2,562

    Default

    binary interface that brings some 64-bit advantages to the 32-bit world.
    No, that's the other way round. It brings some 32-bit advantages to the 64-bit world, if you want to use such a construct.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    558

    Default

    if programs are compiled as x32, which libraries will they link to? x86 libraries, or x64 libraries?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sonadow View Post
    if programs are compiled as x32, which libraries will they link to? x86 libraries, or x64 libraries?
    None of them. They will link to x32 libraries.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Posts
    2,562

    Default

    Indeed, x32 is its own architecture in that regard.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Madison, WI, USA
    Posts
    874

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TAXI View Post
    None of them. They will link to x32 libraries.
    So, the next question... what sort of compatibility in a multi-lib system can we expect?

    The processor is 64-bit and is using the x86-64 instruction set, but with 32-bit pointers... so it's a bit of a hybrid.

    Will we get the lowest-common-denominator (i.e. x86), or do we also get compatibility with 64-bit libraries/programs?

    Or is x32 special and can only run x32 code?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    744

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    Indeed, x32 is its own architecture in that regard.
    Which is what puzzles me about why it's deemed necessary. As far as I can tell, its only advantage is that it gains some of the performance benefits of 64-bit hardware, without the extra memory use that comes from doubling the size of every pointer. That's not a big advantage, considering the hit you're taking from having to install duplicates of every library from glibc through to KDE/Gnome - and if you're actually running a mix of both x32 and x86_64, having to have both sets of libraries loaded into memory. Is anyone actually going to be coming out ahead by using this?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,024

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    No, that's the other way round. It brings some 32-bit advantages to the 64-bit world, if you want to use such a construct.
    Most appropriate to say that it brings AMD64 advantages (more registers, newer instructions, new calling convention) to the 32-bit world that doesn't need or want the larger address space and pointer size.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania, United States
    Posts
    1,900

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Delgarde View Post
    Which is what puzzles me about why it's deemed necessary. As far as I can tell, its only advantage is that it gains some of the performance benefits of 64-bit hardware, without the extra memory use that comes from doubling the size of every pointer. That's not a big advantage, considering the hit you're taking from having to install duplicates of every library from glibc through to KDE/Gnome - and if you're actually running a mix of both x32 and x86_64, having to have both sets of libraries loaded into memory. Is anyone actually going to be coming out ahead by using this?
    Thats exactly what it does Delgarde, you get the performance benefits of the 64bit, without the memory implications. So say you've got a brand new CPU but only 1gig of memory (for whatever reason) x32 is your best option.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •