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Thread: Smart Scopes Get Removed From Ubuntu 13.04

  1. #1
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    Default Smart Scopes Get Removed From Ubuntu 13.04

    Phoronix: Smart Scopes Gets Removed From Ubuntu 13.04

    It's been decided at the last minute that "smart scopes", a feature of the new Unity desktop, will not ship in Ubuntu 13.04...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTMzODg

  2. #2
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    Very good move. 13.04 is so fine tuned and good working.
    Bringing in no finished software would have boiled this near perfect release.

  3. #3
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    Agreed, happy to see this and an acknowledgement of an unfinished product, and postponement of it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pajn View Post
    Very good move. 13.04 is so fine tuned and good working.
    Bringing in no finished software would have boiled this near perfect release.
    I wish I could run it, but I don't know if I can downgrade X.org because it wont work with the legacy catalyst drivers.

  5. #5
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    Smart scopes is proprietary crapware. It's dependent on closed-source server-side software.

    *DISLIKE*

  6. #6
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    Less spyware, good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dee. View Post
    Smart scopes is proprietary crapware. It's dependent on closed-source server-side software.

    *DISLIKE*
    So what? If it works and is convenient why not use it? I try not to get stuck in free software religion like Stallman is.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee. View Post
    Smart scopes is proprietary crapware. It's dependent on closed-source server-side software.

    *DISLIKE*
    Which is why you can turn them off, or when Smart Scopes get an official release, you can turn off the ones you don't want individually.
    Great thing, this freedom of choice.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ворот93 View Post
    So what? If it works and is convenient why not use it? I try not to get stuck in free software religion like Stallman is.
    People like you are missing the point about free software. You're too young or ignorant to really understand the idea or what it has given to you.

    Try to imagine a world without free software. A world where every program is developed in secrecy and sold by corporations. Where there are no hackers or coders who do it for the sheer enjoyment of coding, instead only worker drones for large software corporations pushing code in a thankless 9-5 cubicle. Users are all demoted to the role of passive consumption, instead of active participation. You won't be able to control what your computer does, as you're only it's user - there's no ideology to support the idea that a user must have full control of their hardware, so every computer, every OS, is riddled with DRM and trusted computing schemes. If you try to copy files that are marked as copyrighted, your computer won't let you. If you try to save eg. video streams on your hard disk, your computer won't let you. Every time you try to perform an action your computer/OS manufacturer has deemed illegal, probably because it goes against other corporate interests, your computer just goes "I can't let you do that, Dave" and maybe reports you on some universal naughty list. There's no such thing as net neutrality, tor, piratism, freedom of speech - all is controlled by corporate interest. No peer-to-peer networks exist, everything follows a top-down passive consumption model.

    See, THAT is the world your "convenience" brings you. That is the cost of ignoring freedom. Free software is not a religion, it is a way to guarantee that the user has some power against the corporations, that the user is in control of their hardware and software. It's digital activism. Hacker ethics. Stallman might be extreme in his views, but it's good that someone like him exists, to bring a balance to all these greedy sellouts who'd forget their free software roots in a heartbeat to make a quick buck.

    Those who would give up freedom for convenience deserve neither.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee. View Post
    People like you are missing the point about free software. You're too young or ignorant to really understand the idea or what it has given to you.

    Try to imagine a world without free software. A world where every program is developed in secrecy and sold by corporations. Where there are no hackers or coders who do it for the sheer enjoyment of coding, instead only worker drones for large software corporations pushing code in a thankless 9-5 cubicle. Users are all demoted to the role of passive consumption, instead of active participation. You won't be able to control what your computer does, as you're only it's user - there's no ideology to support the idea that a user must have full control of their hardware, so every computer, every OS, is riddled with DRM and trusted computing schemes. If you try to copy files that are marked as copyrighted, your computer won't let you. If you try to save eg. video streams on your hard disk, your computer won't let you. Every time you try to perform an action your computer/OS manufacturer has deemed illegal, probably because it goes against other corporate interests, your computer just goes "I can't let you do that, Dave" and maybe reports you on some universal naughty list. There's no such thing as net neutrality, tor, piratism, freedom of speech - all is controlled by corporate interest. No peer-to-peer networks exist, everything follows a top-down passive consumption model.

    See, THAT is the world your "convenience" brings you. That is the cost of ignoring freedom. Free software is not a religion, it is a way to guarantee that the user has some power against the corporations, that the user is in control of their hardware and software. It's digital activism. Hacker ethics. Stallman might be extreme in his views, but it's good that someone like him exists, to bring a balance to all these greedy sellouts who'd forget their free software roots in a heartbeat to make a quick buck.

    Those who would give up freedom for convenience deserve neither.
    I will take iron-fisted control over anarchy any day. People should have their sense of entitlement cut down to size by being forced to toe the line.

    There is no such thing as freedom without regulations.

    And as a content producer myself I refuse to let anybody have free reign over my copyrighted content without paying any royalties or even seeking approval to distribute it.

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