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Thread: Ubuntu To Investigate Digital Rights Management

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  1. #1
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    Default Ubuntu To Investigate Digital Rights Management

    Phoronix: Ubuntu To Investigate Digital Rights Management

    With Ubuntu preparing itself to land on tablets, smart-phones, and other consumer devices, Canonical is beginning to look at ways to support multimedia content protected by Digital Rights Management...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTMxOTc

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    DRM? Thats a "nice" anti-feature where Qt offers excellent support! They have done it for years in a closed up fashion! Yay..

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    The Linux community will hate them for this, and for good reason, but if they were smart, they'd just leave it up to the new HTML5 DRM standard, which means others will get the blame for "having DRM on Linux" through HTML5. That, however, means they'll have to wait until a lot of content is HTML5-ready. Netflix should adopt the HTML5 DRM very soon, since they were actually one of the main supporters of it.

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    Right now Diablo III and SimCity players wait 30 Minutes at least while requiring permanent internet connection.
    SHIT NO! DRM on Linux in core components = SELFDESTRUCTION

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    Nasty week for the Ubuntu's reputation...

    By the way, is DRM achivable in a FOSS environment? For me it only means easy circuvment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by karasu View Post
    Nasty week for the Ubuntu's reputation...

    By the way, is DRM achivable in a FOSS environment? For me it only means easy circuvment.
    Buying legal apps done in proprietary way is not done due to DRM.
    Ask VALVE. No one is trying to circuvment Steam, unless he has serious reason.
    People choose Steam simply because their software is updated, maintained, in-game sessions cheater-protected and all social side also attached.
    They do not start to distribute games illegal way because DRM protects anything, they stay with Steam only due to service features it offers which are worthy it.

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    DRM was part of the reason I left Windows and migrated to Linux.

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    Right... I suppose it's time to start calling Ubuntu "Ubuntu/Linux", just like Android/Linux, to differentiate them from the rest of GNU/Linux.
    On that note, since Sailfish is based on the Mer platform, which is based on GNU/Linux, I guess it should be called "Sailfish Mer/GNU/Linux"?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by brosis View Post
    Ask VALVE. No one is trying to circuvment Steam, unless he has serious reason.
    Cracked Steam games are all over the place. Freeloaders still want free games, easy Steam purchase or not.

    Steam _customers_ are less likely to break Steam DRM, but it does happen for various reasons, not all of which are "serious." It happens in a small enough quantity and for benign enough reasons not to care, usually, but it happens. The problematic ones are the folks breaking it to upload those cracked copies, of course.

    This is part of the reason that Free To Play is catching on. You no longer care where or how consumers get a game, because you aren't charging for it. Since they're all online games, they essentially force a kind of always-on DRM by forcing you to pay to unlock content on their secured servers; there's no way to download or pirate bits in their databases, generally. You can hit any Torrent site, download the game, and then still get addicted and hand over $100+ for hats or skins or upgrades or whatever.

    Like, say, what Valve is doing with TF2 or DOTA2. DRM becomes irrelevant, so long as you're not EA and can actually provision your servers and architect your game to scale to demand. F2P even makes more money in many cases. 1,000,000 paying players paying $60/copy (or less, on sales, older titles, smaller titles, etc) is less money than 10,000,000 players where 10% pay over $100+ in in-game sales.

    I am a fan of more traditional content-focused games, but it's impossible to deny that traditional DRM is becoming less relevant to gaming while F2P (and its always-on requirements) trounce on tradition.

    It's like how all the complaints over SimCity are over "DRM," while the reality is that the very game design requires and Internet connection due to how regions work. Making it pure single-player is not just a matter of removing DRM, and their model lets them eventually move to having in-game purchases to improve your city. It'd be like complaining that WoW doesn't work offline. It's conceptually similar to DRm - be a paying customer or you can't play - but it's not really DRM so much as it a consequence of how the game works. It just happens to have always-on DRM qualities, including the really bad ones like being unable to play if servers are down, being unable to play on an airplane or in remote areas, and being unplayable once the servers are no longer considered worthwhile to keep online.

    The music and movie industry can't really do this. Unlike a game, you can save a streamed movie and give it to someone else and they get the same experience. There is no component that requires secret sauce on a server to make it work. So movies and music are still interested in traditional DRM where the OS/hardware enforces verification of payment somehow.

    For movies, this is moving to things where the bytestream itself is encrypted and only hardware can read it. Hardware then refuses to let the CPU read frame contents and requires that the output device is a verified display-only device like a monitor. This is honestly something the Linux graphics stack in general should support it (eg like DXGI1.2/D3D11.1 does with a nice userspace API, like DRM3/libdrm could do on Linux in the future) if it wants to make full use of the various video playback hardware devices out there. It basically requires not only adding the interfaces to feed video streams into the decode hardware, but also arranging all the HDCP shenanigans, and supporting the creation of buffers with content protection flags (in an ideal world, hardware fully enforces said flags, requiring no OS secret sauce; said buffers just can't be read into the CPU, and can't be used as a source unless all output buffers are marked as protected, and the system compositor uses protected flags when possible so it can still do movie thumbnails and the like; for screenshots it can just use default textures for those windows, so screenshots work but don't try to copy from protected buffers). These protected buffers can be used for good, too, e.g. such as making any private windows protected, or browsers accessing secured sites protected, so rogue users/processes can't try to read secure details behind your back. It's like TPM or SecureBoot: usable for good or evil. Just more often for evil.

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