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Thread: A Year Later, Linux Game Publishing Is Still Irrelevant

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  1. #1
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    Default A Year Later, Linux Game Publishing Is Still Irrelevant

    Phoronix: A Year Later, Linux Game Publishing Is Still Irrelevant

    This coming week marks one year since there was the big shake-up at Linux Game Publishing where Michael Simms, the founder and CEO of twelve years, stepped down. A new CEO stepped in, and there were promises of future work, but so far there's been any major announcements and LGP continues to fade away...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTI4NTM

  2. #2
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    I would definitely ask the question who really cared about GNU/Linux-Gaming, if it currently wasn't about losing our freedom.
    Steam and other proprietary gaming-platforms are deliberately opposing software-freedom and thus might be even more damaging to GNU/Linux-Gaming, if it existed, than the "lack" of real software-titles.
    We really should think about the motives for Steampowered to port their platform and if it is worth it; I don't think they do this in a non-self-serving way and thus rather in the interest of making the GNU/Linux-Users solely dependent on commercial interests when it comes to games.
    I don't know what you think, but I am not begging them to steal our freedom as many people in the GNU/Linux-community (including Michael) sadly do.

    You might call me purist, but going the other way is not that different from Microsoft's and especially Apple's direction concerning respecting the users' freedom.
    Last edited by frign; 01-27-2013 at 12:47 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by frign View Post
    I don't know what you think, but I am not begging them to steal our freedom as many people in the GNU/Linux-community (including Michael) sadly do.
    It's always fascinating to see the way people can abuse language to completely distort reality.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnc View Post
    It's always fascinating to see the way people can abuse language to completely distort reality.
    Thanks for bringing in meaningful arguments instead of bashing one by the means he uses language.

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    Quote Originally Posted by frign View Post
    Thanks for bringing in meaningful arguments instead of bashing one by the means he uses language.
    I don't have any particular argument for or against the topic at hand. What I criticized is the way that you abused language to put forward a proposition that's clearly contrary to the truth. And what's worse is that you heaped a calumny on a group of people who simply do not fit the allegation.

    Somewhere in your diatribe you probably had a valid point to make, but you ruined it by making ridiculous claims. Perhaps you were just engaging in hyperbole to the nth degree.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnc View Post
    I don't have any particular argument for or against the topic at hand. What I criticized is the way that you abused language to put forward a proposition that's clearly contrary to the truth. And what's worse is that you heaped a calumny on a group of people who simply do not fit the allegation.

    Somewhere in your diatribe you probably had a valid point to make, but you ruined it by making ridiculous claims. Perhaps you were just engaging in hyperbole to the nth degree.
    Maybe you might first read the statement above before we talk about this sensitive topic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by frign View Post
    I would definitely ask the question who really cared about GNU/Linux-Gaming, if it currently wasn't about losing our freedom.
    Steam and other proprietary gaming-platforms are deliberately opposing software-freedom and thus might be even more damaging to GNU/Linux-Gaming, if it existed, than the "lack" of real software-titles.
    We really should think about the motives for Steampowered to port their platform and if it is worth it; I don't think they do this in a non-self-serving way and thus rather in the interest of making the GNU/Linux-Users solely dependent on commercial interests when it comes to games.
    I don't know what you think, but I am not begging them to steal our freedom as many people in the GNU/Linux-community (including Michael) sadly do.

    You might call me purist, but going the other way is not that different from Microsoft's and especially Apple's direction concerning respecting the users' freedom.
    +1 (finally?), as a "Linux gamer" that supports FOSS gaming (no, I do not think proprietary software is "evil". DRM however is, as its only use is to sell more copies of something in "evil" ways).

    "what we say" versus "what we do" again. Gabe Newell once said he was against DRM, yet Steam and some games made by Valve use DRM.
    Last edited by Calinou; 01-27-2013 at 03:45 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by frign View Post
    I would definitely ask the question who really cared about GNU/Linux-Gaming, if it currently wasn't about losing our freedom.
    Steam and other proprietary gaming-platforms are deliberately opposing software-freedom and thus might be even more damaging to GNU/Linux-Gaming, if it existed, than the "lack" of real software-titles.
    We really should think about the motives for Steampowered to port their platform and if it is worth it; I don't think they do this in a non-self-serving way and thus rather in the interest of making the GNU/Linux-Users solely dependent on commercial interests when it comes to games.
    I don't know what you think, but I am not begging them to steal our freedom as many people in the GNU/Linux-community (including Michael) sadly do.

    You might call me purist, but going the other way is not that different from Microsoft's and especially Apple's direction concerning respecting the users' freedom.
    My view on this issue is less severe. As a matter of fact, so is the view of the FSF. You are right that Steam is definitely not something that promotes the ideals of the FSF, is restrictive and is a time bomb. But nobody is forcing us to use it. As a matter of fact, we probably are not even allowed to use it - I can't accept their license agreement, therefore I can't install Steam to begin with. But others don't mind it. They don't care about it as deeply. And that works for the best. For all that Steam does wrong, the fact that it's available on GNU/Linux is a good thing overall. That allows more people to ditch Windows, and that's already a good step. It also shifts the popularity. More people using Linux means more corporate interest in Linux. It means that it gets more commercially viable. And attention attracts additional attention. People who did not even consider porting their games to GNU/Linux may start considering it. With more people, even non-gaming companies may start porting their applications, or developing new ones cross-platform. And that is all positive feedback, it accelerates the move.

    More people using GNU/Linux and more people developing for Linux means more people who may become interested in free software, too. Perhaps the subset of people who do won't be as large as it would be otherwise, but the potential is there. With enough attention, new software may even become developed on GNU/Linux first, rather than on Windows, and it may be free or at least partially free software. Plus, people who care about software freedom are not going away, they will be there to inform others.

    In the end, we don't need to use Steam, but it does its job. It might be evil, but it's a good tool. A tool that may very well start the whole cycle. For now, it's a bit early to tell if it is going to work out or not, but again, the potential is there.

    The advice that RMS gave is overall good - those who care about software freedom should not promote Steam, and do point out its flaws, but let's not be too critical of those who do use it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    For all that Steam does wrong, the fact that it's available on GNU/Linux is a good thing overall. That allows more people to ditch Windows, and that's already a good step.
    Agreed. I'm a gamer/Steam user and with the release of the Linux client and a TF2 port I was able to completely ditch Windows months ago and haven't looked back (plus the extra freed up hard drive space was nice ).

    One argument I sometimes hear is that if I run something closed source like Steam and it's games I should just use Windows anyway. I'm not sure I like that argument, surely it's better that I be running a closed source application on a mostly FOSS operating system than running a closed application on a very closed OS

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    My view on this issue is less severe. As a matter of fact, so is the view of the FSF. You are right that Steam is definitely not something that promotes the ideals of the FSF, is restrictive and is a time bomb. But nobody is forcing us to use it. As a matter of fact, we probably are not even allowed to use it - I can't accept their license agreement, therefore I can't install Steam to begin with. But others don't mind it. They don't care about it as deeply. And that works for the best. For all that Steam does wrong, the fact that it's available on GNU/Linux is a good thing overall. That allows more people to ditch Windows, and that's already a good step. It also shifts the popularity. More people using Linux means more corporate interest in Linux. It means that it gets more commercially viable. And attention attracts additional attention. People who did not even consider porting their games to GNU/Linux may start considering it. With more people, even non-gaming companies may start porting their applications, or developing new ones cross-platform. And that is all positive feedback, it accelerates the move.

    More people using GNU/Linux and more people developing for Linux means more people who may become interested in free software, too. Perhaps the subset of people who do won't be as large as it would be otherwise, but the potential is there. With enough attention, new software may even become developed on GNU/Linux first, rather than on Windows, and it may be free or at least partially free software. Plus, people who care about software freedom are not going away, they will be there to inform others.

    In the end, we don't need to use Steam, but it does its job. It might be evil, but it's a good tool. A tool that may very well start the whole cycle. For now, it's a bit early to tell if it is going to work out or not, but again, the potential is there.

    The advice that RMS gave is overall good - those who care about software freedom should not promote Steam, and do point out its flaws, but let's not be too critical of those who do use it.
    I like your point, but am concerned about the effects Steam might initiate.
    Nevertheless, a balanced view is definitely the most rational currently.

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