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Thread: THQ Is Looking At Bringing Their Games To Linux

  1. #21
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    Sep 2008
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    The main pitfall of doing any "cost/benefit analysis" on Linux gaming is that most studios look at the short-term, "here and now" numbers and judge it from there. But there are a lot of intangibles that come with bringing your game to a free and open platform with a bunch of technologists and social media magnates just hungering for your games. If you just look at it in terms of immediate profits, most games based heavily on Windows-only technologies are not worth the cost.

    Supporting Linux has to be a long-term strategy for the company, and it has to involve going "all in" on the Linux platform: supporting it as the premiere platform for all of your titles, and driving adoption of the platform by way of your games.

    A lot of developers are rightfully fed up with the lack of flexibility and tyrannical behavior of Microsoft, and would benefit hugely from using a free and open operating system with no strings attached. But all they're willing to do is run "market studies" to determine the approximate number of people currently on that platform who are willing to buy their games, so almost always those calculations come up short. They're just taking the wrong approach. You can't just bring a game to Linux as casually as you might add PS3 support to a PC/Xbox game, because on well-established platforms you can just drop the game into retail stores and the profit will come with minimal effort on your part.

    Most companies don't want to build a platform user base simultaneously with porting games to that platform. Valve is the thought leader in that space among game developers. Others need to follow in order for the movement to succeed, though, and put a forceful end to the notion that you have to keep Windows around to play games.

  2. #22
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    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by allquixotic View Post
    The main pitfall of doing any "cost/benefit analysis" on Linux gaming is that most studios look at the short-term, "here and now" numbers and judge it from there. But there are a lot of intangibles that come with bringing your game to a free and open platform with a bunch of technologists and social media magnates just hungering for your games. If you just look at it in terms of immediate profits, most games based heavily on Windows-only technologies are not worth the cost.

    Supporting Linux has to be a long-term strategy for the company, and it has to involve going "all in" on the Linux platform: supporting it as the premiere platform for all of your titles, and driving adoption of the platform by way of your games.

    A lot of developers are rightfully fed up with the lack of flexibility and tyrannical behavior of Microsoft, and would benefit hugely from using a free and open operating system with no strings attached. But all they're willing to do is run "market studies" to determine the approximate number of people currently on that platform who are willing to buy their games, so almost always those calculations come up short. They're just taking the wrong approach. You can't just bring a game to Linux as casually as you might add PS3 support to a PC/Xbox game, because on well-established platforms you can just drop the game into retail stores and the profit will come with minimal effort on your part.

    Most companies don't want to build a platform user base simultaneously with porting games to that platform. Valve is the thought leader in that space among game developers. Others need to follow in order for the movement to succeed, though, and put a forceful end to the notion that you have to keep Windows around to play games.
    These market studies are actually telling the vast majority of developers the truth. Moving a single game to linux isn't likely to result in any changes in the number of people who buy games on the platform. However, when you sit down and decide you want to build a platform and an eco system long term, and you are incontrol of a large enough base of software to do it, then the rules are probably different to you.

    When THQ sit down and think about porting their games to linux, one of the first things in their mind should be the fact valve is behind the platform and is releasing a console within the next year. I'd say being an early adopter and basically having their games as launch titles is probably a good idea.

    Theres also the fact that steam is a big deal in PC gaming and it's probably the cheapest mass-market way to publish your game.

  3. #23
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    Nov 2007
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    http://www.shacknews.com/article/771...for-bankruptcy

    "The sale and filing are necessary next steps to complete THQ's transformation and position the company for the future, as we remain confident in our existing pipeline of games, the strength of our studios and THQ's deep bench of talent," THQ CEO Brian Farrell said. "We are grateful to our outstanding team of employees, partners and suppliers who have worked with us through this transition. We are pleased to have attracted a strong financial partner for our business, and we hope to complete the sale swiftly to make the process as seamless as possible."

  4. #24
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    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yfrwlf View Post
    No one mentioned Supreme Commander! At least Planetary Annihilation will be for Linux though, if it is any good.
    I logged in to say the same, how did that title get missed, Supreme Commander on Linux FTW!!!

    Very much looking forward to Planetary Annihilation too. Warhammer would be nice to have on Linux too.

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