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Thread: Green Island: A New Qt-Based Wayland Compositor

  1. #1
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    Default Green Island: A New Qt-Based Wayland Compositor

    Phoronix: Green Island: A New Qt-Based Wayland Compositor

    Less than one day after the official release of Wayland 1.0 there is a new Wayland compositor that emerges. This new compositor for Wayland is dubbed "Green Island" and leverages Qt, QtQuick, and QML for creating a new and unique Linux desktop experience...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTIxMzc

  2. #2
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    The first screenshot looks suspiciously Ubuntu like.

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up

    Seems very promising. I'll take a look into it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    The first screenshot looks suspiciously Ubuntu like.
    Yep I must admit it seems like Unity although it was not meant to copy it
    I was experimenting with the GUI before talking with the designer and wanted to see how a vertical panel would work, in my mind it would have been a little different (much more like MacOS X which expands the dock as icons are added) but I was more interested in trying the concept instead of loosing time with sizing.

  5. #5
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    Default Old login manager screenshot

    Shame on me for keeping old (very) early prototype screenshots, the login manager is now better looking.
    You can take a look here: http://www.maui-project.org/static/i...in-manager.png

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    Updated login manager screenshot is here: http://www.maui-project.org/static/i...in-manager.png

    Shame on me for keeping (very) early prototype screenshots around.

  7. #7
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    I'd rather stick with Debian (derivative) & KDE.

    If someone wants to make a really novel compositer, why not put that 3D hardware to use and make something that allows us to use spatial awareness to locate and place windows? Maybe use Minority Report for inspiration. Yes it's been done before and no it probably wouldn't increase productivity, but being able to seamlessly transition between work and a shooter or something would be cool, as well as being able to embed content from 3D applications (e.g. architectural) directly in the desktop environment.

    Isn't it time 3D escaped individual applications?

    P.S. wasn't meaning to be negative, just hoping to inspire someone to go beyond the status quo ;-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by plfiorini View Post
    Yep I must admit it seems like Unity although it was not meant to copy it
    I was experimenting with the GUI before talking with the designer and wanted to see how a vertical panel would work, in my mind it would have been a little different (much more like MacOS X which expands the dock as icons are added) but I was more interested in trying the concept instead of loosing time with sizing.
    The problem with unity/ubuntu is that it inherits much of the brain damage found in Gnome 3. When designing a DE the main focus should IMO be: 1) The user must get everything done as fast as possible and 2) don't make assumptions about how users interact with the DE. ie most people work with just the mouse so don't assume that they use keyboard shortcuts even though you should have keyboard shortcuts (and those should be familiar).

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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    The problem with unity/ubuntu is that it inherits much of the brain damage found in Gnome 3. When designing a DE the main focus should IMO be: 1) The user must get everything done as fast as possible and 2) don't make assumptions about how users interact with the DE. ie most people work with just the mouse so don't assume that they use keyboard shortcuts even though you should have keyboard shortcuts (and those should be familiar).
    Both Unity and Gnome Shell are competent desktop environments. Far better than Gnome 2 in my books, but of course the "hard core" Linux people would differ with me there. I do wish someone would make a good third option though. KDE never flowed very well for me, and XFCE/LXDE just feel too much like Gnome 2. I'm quite interested in the UI being designed for Elementary Luna though. And when will someone create a Win8-style DE for Linux? The design principles are retardedly simple, so surely someone will put it together for kicks and giggles eventually? I dunno.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    I don't mean to be picking on you but seriously what do you like so much about Unity or Gnome Shell? What is so much better about not having a taskbar and not being able to switch between windows in one click? For so many years we could do that now we can't. How is this better than Gnome 2? Please answer me as I am seriously trying to understand what is going on here and how can people actually like these new inventions!
    I usually just alt-tab and alt-` between windows, so I don't use the bar for window switching as much, but I will give you a few examples that Average Joe may notice in Unity.

    Consistent Placement: The items on the bar remain static, so you always know exactly where the application you're looking for is when you want to switch to it.

    Large Icons: Having large, color-coded icons improves visual memory and also helps you identify what you're looking for significantly faster than plaintext with a small icon.

    That's just to address the one concern you gave. I'll list a few others. On Unity in particular, you've got global search at your disposal, so one keypress or click and you can immediately find and launch anything by name with just the enter key. That's infinitely better than digging through Gnome 2's app menu, let alone browsing for a particular file. Gnome Shell offers a similar feature. In Gnome Shell (and Unity as I have it configured) there is a hot corner (and keyboard shortcut) that immediately exposes all windows in a fashion where you can continue on and click the one you want immediately. No reading titles and trying to identify which one is which. This is a tremendous booster. I love Unity's HUD feature personally. That's one thing I've always missed from Mac. As far as I'm concerned the only real regression is the loss of the Compiz Cube, but I'll take Unity and Gnome Shell's extremely up to date visual styles over that any day. Gnome Shell is beautiful, hands down. Unity looks about as good as Windows 7, which means that it is pleasing to the eye, just not overly amazing. By default Gnome 2 was a downright eyesore. I would spend days configuring it in order to make it acceptable with things like Emerald.
    Last edited by coder543; 10-23-2012 at 03:13 PM.

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