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Thread: id Software Has No Plans For Doom 3 BFG On Linux

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    So they look the same but with the brightness turned up a little? And specular modified a little? id is really down. I was expecting better textures, at least double resolution....
    The textures actually seams to be 2x resolution...

  2. #22
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    Default I think...

    ...nobody should touch the GPLed code or, if it has really good improvements, fork it to something incompatible with Doom 3 BFG.

    Why you may ask. Simple: They tell they got nothing from Linux sales, but now they want us to do their work so Linux users buy the windows version. So let's show them that this isn't the way to go. Maybe they will open up their eyes and port it to Linux then.

  3. #23
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    Why would they put money into a port that can't be reclaimed through sales, plus more for profit?

    Believe me, if we can get a large user base that plays games, id Software and all the other guys will be targeting Linux too. It's just simple numbers.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TAXI View Post
    ...nobody should touch the GPLed code or, if it has really good improvements, fork it to something incompatible with Doom 3 BFG.

    Why you may ask. Simple: They tell they got nothing from Linux sales, but now they want us to do their work so Linux users buy the windows version. So let's show them that this isn't the way to go. Maybe they will open up their eyes and port it to Linux then.
    Seriously, grow up. After all the whining over the Humble Bundle guys not releasing more of their game's source code, seeing this sort of comment really irritates me. This is a very good move on id's part, and I would rather have the source code available than a Linux binary. You get something one way you whine, you get something another and you don't. Try and build something productive out of this. Seriously.

  5. #25
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    Basically the source is more than enough, you could use wine to play the official binary as well but when you are not into MP mode it should not matter if you have got the steam bits in there or not - of course you don't have got archivements without as well. I guess those are the main parts which are missing when the source is released. It would be interesting to see if ID would reuse a custom modified d3 bfg source which runs on Mac and add the missing steam code to sell it there or if another company creates an incompatible binary which is only sold in the apple app store. I would like to see a Mac steam release (and a Linux one as well) as result of a fan made mod. Something like that happened to older games which have been ported to mobile phones later as well.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnc View Post
    Why would they put money into a port that can't be reclaimed through sales, plus more for profit?
    Cause they see less sales and try to rescue them-self by going to every possible customer. Then, as soon as they release linux version they get money.

    But by thinking about it a bit more this isn't that realistic. I am (and still was while writing the other post) overtired like hell.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
    Seriously, grow up.
    Or better: Get some sleep, but this has to wait atm. Seriously, no need to get personal here.
    You get something one way you whine
    Where exactly did you get the impression I'm whining? I just wanted to share a idea which I (wrongly) thought was good. Again: No need for personal attacks. BTW: This is a sign of immaturity, so maybe you should grow up (please take this as a joke).

  7. #27
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    Making an incompatible port would help no one. The original source would still be there. Showing that the Linux community wants a port enough to do the work them self seams a much better idea.

  8. #28
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    What do you mean by incompatible? It is logical that you don't get steam awards with a Linux port or not?

  9. #29
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    People from id software will don't want take risky decisions again, because they released several official games for Linux in the past:

    Quake: The Offering
    Quake II: Colossus
    Quake III Arena

    Linux users didn't bought these games and in this situation they made a right decision about games for Linux

    " With over eight million (1999) Linux users domestically, many of them avid gamers, there haven't been many major game titles released that will run on the Linux operating system -- until now!"

    http://happypenguin.org/html/qlinux.html
    Last edited by gbudny; 11-05-2012 at 05:48 AM.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbudny View Post
    People from id software will don't want take risky decisions again, because they released several official games for Linux in the past:

    Quake: The Offering
    Quake II: Colossus
    Quake III Arena

    Linux users didn't bought these games and in this situation they made a right decision about games for Linux

    " With over eight million Linux users domestically, many of them avid gamers, there haven't been many major game titles released that will run on the Linux operating system -- until now!"

    http://happypenguin.org/html/qlinux.html
    OK let's add some extra info to why these titles weren't seen as that popular on Linux though:

    Quake I - Released in 1996, and according to wikipedia Quake 1 had a linux port released in 1996, however the retail Linux version 'The Offering' didn't come out until 1999. In three years I'm sure people that wanted to play on Linux were already doing so using the existing port. id software had no real way of tracking Linux sales of the game.

    Quake II - Released in 1997. Once again, the linux port for this game existed before it was officially sold in a retail box for Linux, which wasn't released until 1999. id software once again had no way of tracking real Linux sales.

    Quake III - Released in Dec 1999 (really!? that long ago?!). I believe Loki Games were doing an official port to Linux and also selling a tinned box copy. Unfortunately they shipped it a little after the id software retail release of Quake III. Once again, most people waiting for the game would have just bought the Windows release first, and then downloaded the Linux binaries for it later.

    Seriously, how did id software gather their stats on Linux use of their games considering the above? FTP site downloads of the binaries?? They were mirrored in heaps of places!

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