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Thread: Ubuntu To Consider Ridding GNOME Fallback Code

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by lgstoian View Post
    Disables the automatic loading of various system modules such as the free space notifier, Nepomuk services ( or if you try kubuntu install the low fat package ) , you will get less or the same amount of RAM and CPU usage as XFCE while having a more mature DE. Even with no tweaks kde 4.9 ,for me, uses the same resources as GNOME 2. I know everyone is still pissed over the hole KDE 4 fiasco ... but maybe it's time to let go of the anger and move on. Give KDE 4.9 a spin.
    I did try out KDE after admittedly avoiding it for a long time, and was not all that impressed. I am personally not all that fond of it's visual style, a subjective complaint I know, but I was also not that impressed with it's lauded customization. The panel config was bizarre, I have never personally been big on the idea of plasma applets, and the system settings reminded me very much of the ones I already have on Xfce. In fact, I found the customization controls much better handled on Xfce, and the fact I do not need to go about killing settings all over the place is still a big plus in it's favour.

    And while the DE itself does seem to be more stable, the same thing can not be said of it's apps, which is a shame since that is one of KDE's strengths.

    KDE may be nice for people who groove with what they are trying to achieve, but it can really easily rub other people the wrong way.

  2. #12
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    OK.... where are these potheads that assured me that if you don't like that g-shell, you could use the failback mode? That its not going to be removed?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
    KDE may be nice for people who groove with what they are trying to achieve, but it can really easily rub other people the wrong way.
    As a small aside, that is also very true for Gnome Shell as well. Maybe that is true for all "mature DE"s?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
    I did try out KDE after admittedly avoiding it for a long time, and was not all that impressed. I am personally not all that fond of it's visual style, a subjective complaint I know, but I was also not that impressed with it's lauded customization.
    Anything in particular that you didn't like about it's visual style? It's rather flexible in being able to change it from it's default looks, particularly when using Qt-Curve.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    Anything in particular that you didn't like about it's visual style? It's rather flexible in being able to change it from it's default looks, particularly when using Qt-Curve.
    I just do not really like the QT look - do not really know why, and I agree that it is a very superficial complaint. For the record, I am not that fond of how Windows 7 looks either, and they look kind of similar.

    I could probably change it to suit my liking, but with Xfce I do not have to as much.

  6. #16
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    I was planning to deploy gnome-fallback for my clients but I found that it's unusable for non-xinerama dual-head (Zaphod) mode. There's also some bugs with detecting when an application has loaded (hour-glass cursor even when the application window opens) and various compatibility problems with add-ons and the notification area. I'm planning to use XFCE with the Linux Mint menus. It's not perfect but has better long-term prospects. The problems that prevented me from using it before, the disappearing desktop panels and lack of integrated smb network browsing in Thunar, have been fixed.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhansonxi View Post
    I was planning to deploy gnome-fallback for my clients but I found that it's unusable for non-xinerama dual-head (Zaphod) mode.
    This!

    Quote Originally Posted by jhansonxi View Post
    It's not perfect but has better long-term prospects. The problems that prevented me from using it before, the disappearing desktop panels and lack of integrated smb network browsing in Thunar, have been fixed.
    Please elaborate on the integrated smb network browsing, as I have not seen it? Is it something they added in 4.10 or am I just being ignorant?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
    Please elaborate on the integrated smb network browsing, as I have not seen it? Is it something they added in 4.10 or am I just being ignorant?
    Basically the same as Nautilus. Ctrl-L to get the address/location field then enter smb://<servername>/<sharename>

  9. #19
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    So many Gnome 3 haters complain about Gnome Shell under Gnome 3. Don't they know that it can be easily replaced by a menu via extensions? Such extensions include: Frippery Applications Menu, Axe Menu

    Or they are afraid to use it, because it is still labeled as Beta.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fenrin View Post
    So many Gnome 3 haters complain about Gnome Shell under Gnome 3. Don't they know that it can be easily replaced by a menu via extensions? Such extensions include: Frippery Applications Menu, Axe Menu

    Or they are afraid to use it, because it is still labeled as Beta.
    I can't speak for everybody else, but in my case I've built a nice desktop and customized my workflow in classic GNOME. It's the way that I want to work. But if I want the up-to-date kernel or the latest update for my OS for the compatibility features, I've got to completely abandon the manner in which I want my computer to operate, and search blindly for features, programs, and settings which were moved, obfuscated, or just plain hacked out. It rather feels like being mugged in a way. Fortunately (for now), fallback mode exists which allows one to sidestep the Super Dummy G3 Experience (tm).

    Now of course I'm not entitled to getting the GNOME people to do things my way. But I'm not obligated to radically reorganize the way I work because some dev somewhere made an executive decision, either. GNOME 3 is too different from what came before to expect everybody to just fall in love with it at first blush. Especially when it renders a system which once worked to please its user into something which is effectively unusable without extensive retraining.

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