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Thread: Mid-2012: Arch Linux vs. Slackware vs. Ubuntu vs. Fedora

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Default Mid-2012: Arch Linux vs. Slackware vs. Ubuntu vs. Fedora

    Phoronix: Mid-2012: Arch Linux vs. Slackware vs. Ubuntu vs. Fedora

    At the request of many Phoronix readers following the release of updated Arch Linux media, here are some new Arch Linux benchmarks. However, this is not just Arch vs. Ubuntu, but rather a larger Linux distribution performance comparison. In this article are benchmark results from Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, CentOS 6.2, Fedora 17, Slackware 14.0 Beta, and Arch Linux.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=17688

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Default

    Is there any point with these benchmarks? I feel that when you compare the speed of programs running on the latest versions from the most popular distributions, the results wont really be that much different from each other. And any differences can't really be explained anyway. Theyre all running on the same hardware with the same kernel and probably the same scheduler, compiled with the same compiler. Correct me if I'm wrong but I feel that any differences in performance has more to do with scheduling and maybe the way the program is compiled than anything else

    Might as well just pick the distro you feel most comfortable with and stick to it, rather than base your choice on benchmarks

  3. #3
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    Jul 2012
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    Default

    I've always heard that Slackware performs great because it's more simple and vanilla. I guess it's just a myth?

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by igano View Post
    I've always heard that Slackware performs great because it's more simple and vanilla. I guess it's just a myth?
    I'm also surprised with Slackware coming out so bad. I wanted to say that Slackware's packages (and probably the kernel too) is compiled for i486. However I now see the benchmark was done on x86_64 (so hopefully Slackware64 was used)...
    Maybe there still are some differences in kernel settings, e.g. Slackware could have a server scheduling (less context switches per second and less preemption points) and something like Ubuntu could use the desktop settings. But in case of benchmarks the server settings could actually be an advantage.

    So I can't explain this and I find it sad as I am using it for years

  5. #5
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    Default Don't forget Arch is no big name behind, that's the different.

    Everytime I see Arch can easily switch from one technology to another (for example, adopt systemd for inintialization) , I am still amazed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Default

    wierd about slackware
    stock scheduler frequency is 1000hz, same as others
    and packages are compiled (for64bit) usualy with SLKCFLAGS="-O2 -fPIC" (or -O3, this is from the fluxbox slackbuild)

    almost all vanilla, except for security patches and if something has a problem by default(example X11 has a "x11.startwithblackscreen.diff.gz" patch)
    only thing blatently different is that KDE is the default, althou theres alot more WM's there

    maybe some1 else knows why shud it be 10-20% slower ?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Default

    You could set these systems up identically. That's where the futility of these tests lay. However that being said Ubuntu's default did fair better than I would of given it credit for.

    I haven't done a install of Arch since the swap, mostly because my Arch box's never need a re-install and the server heads use the LTS branch so until I get a new computer to mess with I won't get to try the new scripts, may VM it just for fun.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganloo View Post
    Everytime I see Arch can easily switch from one technology to another (for example, adopt systemd for inintialization) , I am still amazed.
    This should not be very distro specific. In the end having systemd just means having some exta files on your harddrive and adding init=/bin/systemd to your KERNEL line.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    5

    Default Desktop Environments Would Be Cool!

    I know this seems useless but it proved that their really isn't much different in speed.

    BUT I know my Son's Netbook can't play YouTube videos at above 320P UNLESS I use a Window Manager like Awesome!

    Also the call of KDE bloat from Gnome people has always made me CRAZY since Gnome 2.X and 3.X always used more memory and cpu on my machines.

    So can we have a test of:

    Gnome 2
    Gnome 3
    Unity
    KDE 4
    Xfce
    LXDE
    OpenBox
    Awesome

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Default In defense of

    Normally I'd let this slide but you're testing different kernels here.

    Cent0S is using 2.6.32: You're comparing it against Ubuntu 12.04 when you should be comparing it against Ubuntu 10.04.

    At best, you should be comparing against Slackware 13.1 (2.6.34) and so on....

    Linux 3.5 has made so many changes to the Ext4 file-system I wouldn't even know where to start talking about performance in relation to your test criteria.

    Another thing about Slackware is that if you choose the default -- install everything -- then most likely you got the HUGE Kernel compiled i486.

    You'd basically have to check /boot/vmlinuz to see where it's symlink'd to.

    To recap: Cent0S 6.2 -> Ubuntu 10.04 [ 2.6.32 kernel ]
    Cent0S 6.2 -> Slackware 13.1 [ never used the .32 stable ]
    ....

    Respectfully,.

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