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Thread: What Are The Biggest Problems With Linux?

  1. #231
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    57

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    1) Developing for linux is like trying to shoot a diving hawk with a slingshot two kilometres away blindfolded. That's why there is so much unnecessary work that needs to be done: packaging for every individual distro, maintaining package in repository, testing aka freeze periods to make sure they all fit together, testing make scripts individually.... it's a bloody mess. I would prefer a situation where dev himself simply packages his binary and that's it.
    2) Empowering user instead of power-user/developer is still utopia. Core problem is that entire system relies on sysadmin to be available at all times, and a sysadmin that knows what he is doing at that. That is because most of settings still need CLI. Bad sysadmin - like a kid - can way too easily destroy whole system. So you wanna install Flash on family computer to see funny videos but dad is on two month business trip to Uganda? Sorry kid, your dad's files are too important!
    3) GNOME has good effort in it especially starting with GNOME 3.2, but it is not enough. Basic things like setting the amount of lines one click on mousewheel scrolls globally are impossible because of underlying design fuckups which nobody has fixed in 20 years and original guy is propably dead already.
    4) While GNOME has good effort going on, so has XFCE, Mate, Trinity, Unity and even to lesser extend but with less success KDE. What I mean is GUI toolkits, enviroments and libraries are a mess. Chakra is the only distro I know of which at least attempts to function like a operating system with one standard way of making applications for it, being Qt-only and purged of GTK/Mono entirely. Now most of you are like "why would you do so", where I answer "so that your system doesn't end up broken inside like Windows ME". Plus it is more than likely possible to test and maintain limited set of libraries than stapling everything together and cross fingers it works.
    5) Bread. Hacking for free only gets you starving and dead. Hacking for corporations gets you bread, boredom and bureaucracy. So you had super-cool idea? Too bad here's buggy Access server. Fix it or die on street. I seriously applaud long-time contributors doing things for free. I don't bother anymore. Someone may pay me for that.
    6) Hacking is not engineering. Sure it was fun being kiddie-tr00h4x0rz back in the days but trying to figure out things deeper just made me confused. There is only so much one can figure out by himself without starving to death while at it. Unless, ofcourse, you are a Batman with trillion moneys on account.

    so yeah.

  2. #232
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by daedaluz View Post
    1)
    2) Empowering user instead of power-user/developer is still utopia. Core problem is that entire system relies on sysadmin to be available at all times, and a sysadmin that knows what he is doing at that. That is because most of settings still need CLI. Bad sysadmin - like a kid - can way too easily destroy whole system. So you wanna install Flash on family computer to see funny videos but dad is on two month business trip to Uganda? Sorry kid, your dad's files are too important!
    Actually you don't, last time I checked you could install browser plugins by dropping them in ~/.mozilla/plugins/
    There's also a little thing called ssh.

    CLI is necessarily for scripting, and many settings do have wizards available.

  3. #233
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    Jan 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdobrich View Post
    You make a good point and perhaps your experience is different than mine, but from my perspective the breakage is minimal and easily mitigated by a dedicated distribution that is watchful of what it pushes out to its users.

    And if you ever complain about missing hardware drivers, try using a micro-kernel and you'll really understand what no harddrive support means. Great example is throwing Windows XP onto a computer and it doesn't support the network card because it only comes with 31-flavors of network drivers, and the one I've got doesn't exactly fit. It's almost never the case with Linux there. Sure, you might still miss hardware, but you'll have a whole heaping lot more with a monolithic kernel. Not to mention Micro-kernels can (but not necessarily) be inefficient.
    Microsoft just didn't have to care, they had a virtual monopoly, and the OEM's did the hard work for them. So long as a default install can boot to a desktop so the actual drivers can be installed it didn't/doesn't concern them. Usually the user doesn't have to go hunting for drivers.

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