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Thread: The Synaptics Driver That Does Multi-Touch, ClickPads

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    Default The Synaptics Driver That Does Multi-Touch, ClickPads

    Phoronix: The Synaptics Driver That Does Multi-Touch, ClickPads

    Following last weeks release of the new X.Org EvDev input driver that introduces support for multi-touch and smooth scrolling, the updated Synaptics input driver is now available for Linux users. Key features, of course, are multi-touch and ClickPads support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTA3MDY

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    The grammar and technical errors in this "article" are a joke. The click pad is a giant button, parts of it can be sectioned of to be right or middle click but there's nothing fake about them

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    Quote Originally Posted by FireBurn View Post
    The grammar and technical errors in this "article" are a joke. The click pad is a giant button, parts of it can be sectioned of to be right or middle click but there's nothing fake about them
    Well the clickpads themselves are certainly a joke along with modern keyboards. I mean what's with that, why are all of our peripheral devices turning to utter junk when we've had 150+ years of keyboard development from the invention of the typewriter, and there was a point of time where keyboard design had been tuned to perfection. similar story is going for trackpads now, where it's become the hip(ster) thing to remove the discrete buttons and replace it with marked out (or not) touch areas, pardon me but both that design and the clickpad's are just asinine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    Well the clickpads themselves are certainly a joke along with modern keyboards. I mean what's with that, why are all of our peripheral devices turning to utter junk when we've had 150+ years of keyboard development from the invention of the typewriter, and there was a point of time where keyboard design had been tuned to perfection. similar story is going for trackpads now, where it's become the hip(ster) thing to remove the discrete buttons and replace it with marked out (or not) touch areas, pardon me but both that design and the clickpad's are just asinine.
    Please do tell of these "perfect" keyboards.
    I'd love a keyboard which would allow nearly anyone to (very quickly learn) input data as fast as they can talk, not cause repetitive stress injuries, and be usable at all form factors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by liam View Post
    Please do tell of these "perfect" keyboards.
    I'd love a keyboard which would allow nearly anyone to (very quickly learn) input data as fast as they can talk, not cause repetitive stress injuries, and be usable at all form factors.
    It's called the IBM Model M.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    It's called the IBM Model M.
    I'm sure it's possible to do significantly better. Maybe I can self-advertise.

    Back on topic, if multi-touch can offer Mac-style app switching it'll be cool 8)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyborg16 View Post
    I'm sure it's possible to do significantly better. Maybe I can self-advertise.
    That's layout though, I'm talking about the actual hardware. The problems with modern keyboards comes that all their basic designs are utterly terrible. Islands don't feel good and break easily, tiles typically aren't grouved and tend to have too short of keystrokes which causes problems over time when typing. Most chiclet designs were created by sadists, and the only decent-good ones of those form I've found come from Toshiba (best of the three for chiclet), Lenovo, or Samsung. Don't even get me started on the ultra-short stroke keyboards that dominate bestbuys. Gaming periphreals in my experience tend to be especially bad with mushy keys and other annoyances.

    That said there are still some okay keyboards being made even in the wake of all those terrible ones. Microsoft tends to actually make very good keyboards for the key technology they're using, and Toshiba, Lenovo (thinkpad keyboard = <3 ), and Samsung make the best laptop keyboards I've found. Business targeted keyboards also tend to be okay, although they can sometimes be bad too.

    All that said though nothing in terms of actual keyboard quality matches up to the Model M, it's buckling spring technology means the keyboard feels the best of anything and it lasts forever. My only real complaints with it are lack of the Meta key and media buttons, plus maybe make it a half-ergo, and the fact I'm going to have to hack it to use USB when PS/2 ports become obsoleted on desktops. Those are all layout related design things though, which comes as a result of the keyboards being 20+ years old by this point, and says nothing against the actual keyboard quality itself which is second to none.
    Last edited by Luke_Wolf; 03-15-2012 at 03:54 PM.

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    Hmm, I see. I love my thinkpad keyboard in any case. Gaming keyboards yeah, mushy. My desktop keyboard fits that category fine for hammering the keys when gaming but fairly horrible to type on. Never tried an IBM model M though, so maybe I'm missing out.

    In terms of hardware, I'm more interested in things like keyglove and chordite due to the form factor. They're never going to rival these old typewriter layouts we've been using on desktops and laptops for years, but are targetting territory with no current dominant device (other than phone keyboards).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyborg16 View Post
    Hmm, I see. I love my thinkpad keyboard in any case. Gaming keyboards — yeah, mushy. My desktop keyboard fits that category — fine for hammering the keys when gaming but fairly horrible to type on. Never tried an IBM model M though, so maybe I'm missing out.
    mhm, IBM basically set the standard for keyboards which I think is why Thinkpad keyboards remain so good even though the others fell. But yeah, if you've never tried one and you're a keyboard enthusiast it'll be a treat. Only problems are what I've stated above which are a result from them being a 20-30 year old design. I'm not kidding on the lasting forever part either. Only problem I have with my current one that's 20 years old is the minus key on the numpad is a bit tricky about actually acknowledging keypresses, otherwise everything still works (I'm going to open it up one of these days and see what the problem is).

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyborg16 View Post
    In terms of hardware, I'm more interested in things like keyglove and chordite due to the form factor. They're never going to rival these old typewriter layouts we've been using on desktops and laptops for years, but are targetting territory with no current dominant device (other than phone keyboards).
    Interesting devices, I may have to look into those.
    Last edited by Luke_Wolf; 03-15-2012 at 05:02 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    It's called the IBM Model M.
    Even hardwarewise there are some really great alternatives (but make sure you get the Cherry switches; if memory serves Das makes keyboards using only the higher end Cherry spring collapse switch), but the problems I mentioned still remain.
    Having to make those rapid, fine movements with your fingers while contorting your wrists into position is why people get carpal tunnel.
    There are some alternative input devices that help to put your wrists in a more natural position, but they are bizarre.
    My point, however, is that ANY kind of keyboard is going to have the kinds of problems I mentioned in thr previous post.

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