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Thread: Tuxera Claims NTFS Is The Fastest File-System For Linux

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvtcupcakes View Post
    Interesting. So the filesystem has a bunch of security features that a standard home user install of Windows will never use. If everybody is running an Admin account, then what's the point of permissions.
    Admin doesn't quite work the same way on Windows as on Linux, at least with Vista and 7. It's not like root. You don't have permission, for example, to mess with files in Program Files and elsewhere like that, at least not without having to answer the UAC prompt, or more. Windows XP was more lax for admin users, though, I'll give you that.

    Maybe these features are actually used in an enterprise environment.
    Yes they are. And regardless of whether they actually got the use they should have gotten, they are nevertheless very baked into the filesystem. In fact the entire kernel (or "executive" to include the parts outside of the so-called microkernel) has an ACL system for all objects, not just files. They security model is very fancy. In fact, so fancy that people can't quite comprehend it and end up doing the equivalent of chmod 777 or turning of SELinux just so they can get things to work. And don't even get started on all of the compatibility hacks MS has had to introduce over the years to deal with programs (installers and games are the big offenders) that think they can just write to files anywhere (and with hardcoded paths, no less!).

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    Indeed, I'd rather have a file system that is slower but doesn't eat your data for lunch. And yea, it seems that it's an algorithm that does that, although it could be specific to NTFS.
    This. Ext4 has a bunch of data-security features that slow it down. If this driver has all of those data-security features and is still faster, then I would be impressed. But if it doesn't have them, then the bragging is unfounded. Someone could make a much faster EXT4 implementation that also doesn't protect your data.

  3. #13
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    The Windows permission system is so different from the Linux one, that it's very hard to make a driver that can handle those permissions. So on NTFS by default, everyone gets read/write permission, and no one execute.

    By the way, NTFS does not fragment much when using Linux on it. It is not the filesystem itself that fragments, it's Windows.

    I have used an NTFS partition as /home on Linux on some computer, and after a couple of months Windows' defragment tool did not show 1 red line: all white/blue.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qaridarium View Post
    "proprietary NTFS Linux kernel driver "

    do i use a free and opensource system to install an proprietary file system??? LOOL!

    i also use the radeon driver and not the catalyst.... those people should just shut up no one care about proprietary file system drivers...
    People that want stuff that works do. I use the OS radeon driver b/c it's fast enough for desktop/2d usage (I count OpenGL compositing WMs in the 2d category because that's effectively all they do). If I want to play games, I'll use Windows. But I could understand how someone who wants to use Linux and play games or use serious 3d software would want something that works rather than something that's libre. The benefit of libre is minimal except to the ideologues and developers, and only the latter matter in my mind.

  5. #15
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    The mentions of a "delayed metadata update model" immediately bring FreeBSD's soft updates to mind. I wonder how similar they are.

  6. #16
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    LOL @ all the clueless people here who think that somehow EXT4 has "more features" than NTFS, which happens to actually be one of the most advanced filesystems in this universe. The only issue with it is that it's proprietary.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvtcupcakes View Post
    Interesting. So the filesystem has a bunch of security features that a standard home user install of Windows will never use. If everybody is running an Admin account, then what's the point of permissions.

    Maybe these features are actually used in an enterprise environment.
    Again, you don't actually know about Windows. Since Vista, Windows' users doesn't have admin rights by default so these security features apply. Users in Vista and 7 can't delete/modify system files and they need permission (managed by User Account Control) to modifiy all other files outside their personal files.

  8. #18
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    I think at least some of those people aren't as clueless as you think, and they believe that the driver implementation ("Tuxera NTFS") may not have all of the features that "MS NTFS" has. I wouldn't find that hard to believe, though I guess it could be possible that Tuxera NTFS is a feature complete implementation.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JairJy View Post
    Again, you don't actually know about Windows. Since Vista, Windows' users doesn't have admin rights by default so these security features apply. Users in Vista and 7 can't delete/modify system files and they need permission (managed by User Account Control) to modifiy all other files outside their personal files.
    NTFS implements ACLs. You know, the thing that was invented because Unix-style user/group permissions that were invented in the previous century just don't cut it anymore. So yes, there are permission schemes available in NTFS, just like there are in EXT4 and others with ACLs enabled.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvtcupcakes View Post
    Interesting. So the filesystem has a bunch of security features that a standard home user install of Windows will never use.
    Not only that, but it has some features Microsoft themselves didn't use for years. File compression comes to mind.

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