Quote Originally Posted by RealNC View Post
LOL @ all the clueless people here who think that somehow EXT4 has "more features" than NTFS, which happens to actually be one of the most advanced filesystems in this universe. The only issue with it is that it's proprietary.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_file_systems

MetaData

File system↓
  • NTFS
  • EXT4

Stores file owner↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

POSIX file permissions↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Creation timestamps↓
  • NTFS: yes
  • EXT4: yes

Last access/ read timestamps↓
  • NTFS: yes
  • EXT4: yes

Last content modification timestamps↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: yes

This copy created↓
  • NTFS: No
  • EXT4: Unknown

Last metadata change timestamps↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Last archive timestamps↓
  • NTFS: No
  • EXT4: No

Access control lists↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Security/ MAC labels↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Extended attributes/ Alternate data streams/ forks↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Checksum/ ECC
  • NTFS: No
  • EXT4: Partial


Limits

Maximum filename length↓
  • NTFS: 255 characters
  • EXT4: 256 bytes

Allowable characters in directory entries↓
  • NTFS: Any Unicode except NUL and \ / : * ? " < > |
  • EXT4: Any byte except NUL and /

Maximum pathname length↓
  • NTFS: 32,767 Unicode characters with each path component (directory or filename) commonly up to 255 characters long
  • EXT4: No limit defined

Maximum file size↓
  • NTFS: 16 EB (16 10246 bytes)
  • EXT4: 16 GB to 16 TB

Maximum volume size
  • NTFS: 16 EB
  • EXT4: 1 EB (but user tools limited to 16 TB)


Features

Hard links↓
  • NTFS Yes:
  • EXT4: Yes

Symbolic links↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Block journaling↓
  • NTFS: No
  • EXT4: Yes

Metadata-only journaling↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Case-sensitive↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Case-preserving↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

File Change Log↓
  • NTFS: yes
  • EXT4: No

Snapshot↓
  • NTFS: Partial
  • EXT4: No

XIP↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: Yes

Encryption↓
  • NTFS: Yes
  • EXT4: No

COW↓
  • NTFS: Partial
  • EXT4: No

integrated LVM↓
  • NTFS: Unknown
  • EXT4: No

Data deduplication↓
  • NTFS: No
  • EXT4: No

Volumes are resizeable↓
  • NTFS: Online
  • EXT4: Online


Right off hand RealNC, I think you would be the clueless one.

Okay, in all fairness, this listing isn't entirely accurate. For starters I'm referencing WikiPedia, which like RealNC, isn't exactly known for it's accuracy. Most of the listed data seems to check out.

Another problem is that the NTFS entry isn't exactly accurate. Let me explain.

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/...3-f3ac4b7973aa
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTFS#Versions

While most file-systems have a clear pedigree of development, NTFS does not. Microsoft obscures their own NTFS version history. While there are some technical documents outlining Versions 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 3.0, and 3.1, there are additional versions such as 5.0, 5.1, 5.2, 6.0, 6.1 that have also been mentioned.

These updated versions of the NTFS file system often ship with new editions of Microsoft Windows releases. These new versions may, or may not be, backwards compatible with previous Microsoft Windows Operating System installations.

Now, from a purely factual point of view, based on the available documentation, the only real advantage NTFS has is it's size capacity. NTFS 6.1 will address up to 16 Exabytes. EXT4 will only do 16 Terabytes.

However, EXT4 isn't targeted for that market. For tasks that require that much data storage NTFS's opponent would be BtrFS, where NTFS is, in factual terms, way behind. Pretty much every-place that NTFS has a "NO" or a limit, BtrFS has a "YES" or "Work-in-Progress"

To be blunt, the comments from Tuxera, and RealNC in this thread, are a "Mug's Game"

Other forum posters have already singled out one specific problem. Are the Tuxera benchmarks being run within a manufactured environment, or are they benchmarks that reflect daily use?

This raises other questions, such as:

Do the Tuxera benchmarks implement the full range of features NTFS offers, or do they only reference the features exposed in non-commercial editions of Microsoft Windows?

Do the Tuxera benchmarks cover all known versions of the NTFS file system, or do they cover a specific version of the File System?

Until these questions are answered no performance judgment can be made.

Now, as to NTFS as a file-system itself. Keep in mind that when NTFS 3.0 hit with Windows 2000, Microsoft could afford to hire, or in some cases blackmail, the best file-system engineers on the planet to work for them. Yes that was a non-subtle reference to the fact that the Microsoft Corporation is a Convicted Felon.

As a file-system NTFS is indeed competent and competitive. However, that is all that NTFS is. A competent competitor. NTFS is not, by anybody's imagination, a file-system that is years ahead of any other "modern" file-system.

Keep this in mind. The EXT4 specification was announced in 2006 and was stabilized in 2008.

Windows 7 launched a year later in 2009. Despite an extra-development-year on Microsoft's part, the NTFS 6.1 version only has one major advantage over EXT4. NTFS will do 16 Exabytes. That's it.

On top of that, EXT4 retained backwards / fowards compatibility with EXT3: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/li...xt4/index.html

NTFS... didn't.

Take that how you will.