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Thread: Ryan "Icculus" Gordon Will Be Talking This Weekend

  1. #1
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    Default Ryan "Icculus" Gordon Will Be Talking This Weekend

    Phoronix: Ryan "Icculus" Gordon Will Be Talking This Weekend

    Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, the former Loki Software employee who's single-handedly ported many games to Linux and Mac OS X in the years since, will be talking about gaming on Linux this weekend...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTI3NA

  2. #2
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    Jan 2009
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    Default

    I'm a student of University of Illinois at Chicago,
    and I will be there! So far I have decided to attend the talk that Ryan will be giving, I haven't decided on any others.

  3. #3
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    564

    Default I have question!

    Ask about state of OpenGL 4.1 in Linux land (NOT about OpenGL 2.1!!!). Mozilla found many bugs in 2.1, even with proprietary drivers. So how he see OpenGL 4.1 and it's readiness? Can it be useful to game developing, without MacOSX supporting it too? How he feel about recent Khronos developments both in OpenGL and WebGL? Etc.

    PS Have I mentioned that I'm not interested in OpenGL 2.1 info ;P

  4. #4
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    Sep 2008
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    Default

    Get him to talk about Windows, and how Microsoft, Nvidia, Adobe and Apple are his favorite companies in the world.

    Let's get his insight on DirectX 12, and whether he thinks Microsoft will be kind enough to provide some kind of integration between Direct3D 12 and the next Silverlight so people can play intensive games in Internet Explorer on Windows.

    We could get some perspectives on whether he thinks the current driver development model for Apple -- where they develop their drivers with the assistance of Nvidia / ATI -- is working out for them, considering the poor performance and lack of higher GL support.

    Oh I know, let's discuss that poor, poor company, the Santa Cruz Organization (SCO), which got ruthlessly teamed up on and gang banged by Novell and IBM. They were just trying to defend their rightful intellectual property!

    And Ryan's interview shall be the last Phoronix article I read, being that it will be comprised of proprietary nonsense, bundled with doublespeak about "open source" while he himself develops proprietary games for proprietary drivers. He would say anything to justify keeping his cooshy job as a proprietary game developer, selling licenses by the barrel.

    I say let's not interview Ryan "Icculus" Gordon. You want to interview someone? Pick a member of the FSF Board of Directors and interview them about the state of GNU/Linux gaming. Or if you can't stomach that, pick someone from the OSI. It does not matter because the two organizations are working towards the same goal and cooperating more and more.

    As much as the OSI and FSF have espoused valuable principles for the community to live by, they both seem to lack a measure of practicality. I have heard very little from them about the plight of those who would like to use Linux full time, but cannot solely because they enjoy playing games more than they enjoy freedom.

    We need to get one or both of these organizations to realize that these people can become ardent users, supporters and (maybe someday) contributors to FOSS, if only they could get some recognition and some campaigns to swing the balance in their favor. The organizations should start political and development campaigns to persuade developers to value both FOSS graphics drivers and FOSS games. Not to mention, since both the OSI and the FSF oppose software patents (see the link above), the OpenGL software patents are a huge obstacle to both organizations.

    FOSS Linux gaming is a largely untapped area that needs much more attention from the public and corporations alike. The limited impact of a site such as Phoronix pales in comparison to what the two champion organizations of software freedom could do together with their combined influence.

    It would be great if Phoronix could help facilitate these organizations' awareness that a problem exists, and help them develop a strategy for starting to tackle it. The goal is to get enough critical mass of working graphics drivers and available games that the migrations of Windows gamers to Linux gamers starts to accelerate apace. Then the campaigners can sit back and watch the community unfold.

    ...Or maybe Phoronix doesn't value FOSS principles at all, and is just capitalizing on a virtual monopoly in the "Linux gaming news site" market?

    Is it just business? Or do you really care about perpetuating the underlying principles that made GNU and Linux so successful.

    Your choice of interviewee will determine my conclusion, unless you explicitly respond with an official Phoronix (or official Michael) position on FOSS principles...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    113

    Default

    And the capital needed for the development of games on the level of Crysis comes from?
    This is a genuine, non-trollish question as I would seriously like to know of any existing or theoretical business models that can support such a thing. It's not like you can build a support service around a single player game.

  6. #6
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    Default

    I second allquixotic' words. If he is programming proprietary and devotes only msecs of time to bash everything opensource, he is not far from Icaza Idiot.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by allquixotic View Post
    Get him to talk about Windows, and how Microsoft, Nvidia, Adobe and Apple are his favorite companies in the world.

    Let's get his insight on DirectX 12, and whether he thinks Microsoft will be kind enough to provide some kind of integration between Direct3D 12 and the next Silverlight so people can play intensive games in Internet Explorer on Windows.

    We could get some perspectives on whether he thinks the current driver development model for Apple -- where they develop their drivers with the assistance of Nvidia / ATI -- is working out for them, considering the poor performance and lack of higher GL support.

    Oh I know, let's discuss that poor, poor company, the Santa Cruz Organization (SCO), which got ruthlessly teamed up on and gang banged by Novell and IBM. They were just trying to defend their rightful intellectual property!

    And Ryan's interview shall be the last Phoronix article I read, being that it will be comprised of proprietary nonsense, bundled with doublespeak about "open source" while he himself develops proprietary games for proprietary drivers. He would say anything to justify keeping his cooshy job as a proprietary game developer, selling licenses by the barrel.

    I say let's not interview Ryan "Icculus" Gordon. You want to interview someone? Pick a member of the FSF Board of Directors and interview them about the state of GNU/Linux gaming. Or if you can't stomach that, pick someone from the OSI. It does not matter because the two organizations are working towards the same goal and cooperating more and more.

    As much as the OSI and FSF have espoused valuable principles for the community to live by, they both seem to lack a measure of practicality. I have heard very little from them about the plight of those who would like to use Linux full time, but cannot solely because they enjoy playing games more than they enjoy freedom.

    We need to get one or both of these organizations to realize that these people can become ardent users, supporters and (maybe someday) contributors to FOSS, if only they could get some recognition and some campaigns to swing the balance in their favor. The organizations should start political and development campaigns to persuade developers to value both FOSS graphics drivers and FOSS games. Not to mention, since both the OSI and the FSF oppose software patents (see the link above), the OpenGL software patents are a huge obstacle to both organizations.

    FOSS Linux gaming is a largely untapped area that needs much more attention from the public and corporations alike. The limited impact of a site such as Phoronix pales in comparison to what the two champion organizations of software freedom could do together with their combined influence.

    It would be great if Phoronix could help facilitate these organizations' awareness that a problem exists, and help them develop a strategy for starting to tackle it. The goal is to get enough critical mass of working graphics drivers and available games that the migrations of Windows gamers to Linux gamers starts to accelerate apace. Then the campaigners can sit back and watch the community unfold.

    ...Or maybe Phoronix doesn't value FOSS principles at all, and is just capitalizing on a virtual monopoly in the "Linux gaming news site" market?

    Is it just business? Or do you really care about perpetuating the underlying principles that made GNU and Linux so successful.

    Your choice of interviewee will determine my conclusion, unless you explicitly respond with an official Phoronix (or official Michael) position on FOSS principles...
    Can you please point me to your SDL replacement GIT Hub?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Perth, Scotland
    Posts
    433

    Default

    Errm... maybe I'm going mad but I could have sworn I made a post here. Why was it deleted?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Perth, Scotland
    Posts
    433

    Default

    Nevermind, I realise what I posted was partially incorrect. Fair enough.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    350

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allquixotic View Post
    Get him to talk about Windows, and how Microsoft, Nvidia, Adobe and Apple are his favorite companies in the world.

    Let's get his insight on DirectX 12, and whether he thinks Microsoft will be kind enough to provide some kind of integration between Direct3D 12 and the next Silverlight so people can play intensive games in Internet Explorer on Windows.

    We could get some perspectives on whether he thinks the current driver development model for Apple -- where they develop their drivers with the assistance of Nvidia / ATI -- is working out for them, considering the poor performance and lack of higher GL support.

    Oh I know, let's discuss that poor, poor company, the Santa Cruz Organization (SCO), which got ruthlessly teamed up on and gang banged by Novell and IBM. They were just trying to defend their rightful intellectual property!

    And Ryan's interview shall be the last Phoronix article I read, being that it will be comprised of proprietary nonsense, bundled with doublespeak about "open source" while he himself develops proprietary games for proprietary drivers. He would say anything to justify keeping his cooshy job as a proprietary game developer, selling licenses by the barrel.

    I say let's not interview Ryan "Icculus" Gordon. You want to interview someone? Pick a member of the FSF Board of Directors and interview them about the state of GNU/Linux gaming. Or if you can't stomach that, pick someone from the OSI. It does not matter because the two organizations are working towards the same goal and cooperating more and more.

    As much as the OSI and FSF have espoused valuable principles for the community to live by, they both seem to lack a measure of practicality. I have heard very little from them about the plight of those who would like to use Linux full time, but cannot solely because they enjoy playing games more than they enjoy freedom.

    We need to get one or both of these organizations to realize that these people can become ardent users, supporters and (maybe someday) contributors to FOSS, if only they could get some recognition and some campaigns to swing the balance in their favor. The organizations should start political and development campaigns to persuade developers to value both FOSS graphics drivers and FOSS games. Not to mention, since both the OSI and the FSF oppose software patents (see the link above), the OpenGL software patents are a huge obstacle to both organizations.

    FOSS Linux gaming is a largely untapped area that needs much more attention from the public and corporations alike. The limited impact of a site such as Phoronix pales in comparison to what the two champion organizations of software freedom could do together with their combined influence.

    It would be great if Phoronix could help facilitate these organizations' awareness that a problem exists, and help them develop a strategy for starting to tackle it. The goal is to get enough critical mass of working graphics drivers and available games that the migrations of Windows gamers to Linux gamers starts to accelerate apace. Then the campaigners can sit back and watch the community unfold.

    ...Or maybe Phoronix doesn't value FOSS principles at all, and is just capitalizing on a virtual monopoly in the "Linux gaming news site" market?

    Is it just business? Or do you really care about perpetuating the underlying principles that made GNU and Linux so successful.

    Your choice of interviewee will determine my conclusion, unless you explicitly respond with an official Phoronix (or official Michael) position on FOSS principles...
    What are you smoking, and is it growing close to Fukushima?

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