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Thread: Can The Unigine Engine Get Any Better? Yes, And It Has.

  1. #1
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    Default Can The Unigine Engine Get Any Better? Yes, And It Has.

    Phoronix: Can The Unigine Engine Get Any Better? Yes, And It Has.

    While we are still waiting for Unigine Corp (or their partners) to actually release a game based upon the Unigine Engine (Primal Carnage backed out and so their own OilRush game should be the first when it ships this quarter or next), the advanced multi-platform engine continues marching forward. The Unigine Engine already supports OpenGL 3/4 and has amazing graphics as shown by their tech demos like Unigine Heaven and many other features, but they have just made another huge update to this Linux-friendly game engine...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODc1NA

  2. #2
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    Superior editing tools, that's what makes UE3.0 so attractive. Other than that it's not really spectacular.

    Also long support and keeping the engine up with the times by developing after release is what makes UE3.0 so popular.

    If Unigine Engine has similar level of quality tools, lifetime and support it WILL catch on.

  3. #3

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    The screenshots look almost as good as Crysis from ... the beginning of 2007.

    However grass and ground still look awful.

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    Yeah, graphics are great, but they aren't really what makes an engine great. A decent graphics coder can make any half-decent engine shine.

    The core engine architecture is infinitely more important than its graphical capabilities, as that's what determines how easy it is to make a new game on that engine. Unreal in that sense sucks, severely -- the first thing just about every team does when they license Unreal is rewrite large portions of its game object system, so I'm told.

    The editor and tools are also where its at. Unity has one of the best setups in this regard. What makes or breaks an engine in actual production use is how easy the workflow is for the content creators (level designers, artists, etc.) to make a game.

    I'd like to see more information on both of those things in the Unigine engine. I didn't see any documentation links on the Unigine site, albeit I Only looked for a few seconds.

  5. #5
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    I'm excited to see how unigine pans out.
    So far, it's looking like it will catch on.

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    and so their own OilRush game should be the first when it ships this quarter or next)
    Wait OilRush is slipping?

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    Great global illumination! It's what makes thing real.

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    Quote Originally Posted by birdie View Post
    The screenshots look almost as good as Crysis from ... the beginning of 2007.

    However grass and ground still look awful.
    Lol... artwork != graphics tech... Crysis has shitty lightning (the demo scene has better ray tracing examples on consoles from the stone-age), it is not DirectX 11/OpenGL 4.x and has no tesselation, for example.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanthis View Post
    Yeah, graphics are great, but they aren't really what makes an engine great. A decent graphics coder can make any half-decent engine shine.

    The core engine architecture is infinitely more important than its graphical capabilities, as that's what determines how easy it is to make a new game on that engine. Unreal in that sense sucks, severely -- the first thing just about every team does when they license Unreal is rewrite large portions of its game object system, so I'm told.

    The editor and tools are also where its at. Unity has one of the best setups in this regard. What makes or breaks an engine in actual production use is how easy the workflow is for the content creators (level designers, artists, etc.) to make a game.

    I'd like to see more information on both of those things in the Unigine engine. I didn't see any documentation links on the Unigine site, albeit I Only looked for a few seconds.
    The engine code is awesome. I've had some experience with it. The engine is generally well documented. The scripting language itself is basically c++. It is actually close enough that with some minor changes you could actually compile it if you wanted.

    The beginnings of unigine were open source back in the day. So if you do some digging you can find the original source code, and frustrum, their lead developer's, blog about making the engine and the scripting language. So you can see first hand the quality of the code.

    The editor and tools are fairly well documented though sometimes counter intuitive. Though I suspect this is an issue of most complex 3d software. More time is spent on adding features and exposing them; then is spent on making sure the interface is simple, and the work flow intuitive.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdie View Post
    The screenshots look almost as good as Crysis from ... the beginning of 2007.

    However grass and ground still look awful.
    From my views they look like they are supposed, eventually i would doubt many persons would concentrate on details like that in "faster" action games of.

    A partly figuring of ways like that of Elder Scrolls would been at some point of, the potentiality of engine still is that of same as any other that was released previously with same type of "technology demos" of, for example that of pictures they show.

    Those are always in that of same either attempts of providing an nice looking environment without much of an effects other than dynamic shadows and life like attempts.

    As for general usages it falls on that some companies could make an adventure games from those of engine parts released, others would make an Diablo clones with equipment modifiers and folks running after those of slight adjustments towards stats and going on around either "grinding" or "leveling".

    I would like to see that on action of some different way of things, instead of shadows or anything into something completely else in terms of shadowing images, they could try to duplicate that of engine limits an thing like Bejeweled.

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