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Thread: MeeGo Netbook Performance: It's Beating Ubuntu & Co

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by arjan_intel View Post
    there is thing on your computer called "power button", it's the same button you use to turn the machine on....... try it ;-)
    Yeah as I always can run a terminal and write sudo halt.
    I didn't ask though how can I power off my computer but where are the common buttons which do the trick...

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apopas View Post
    Yeah as I always can run a terminal and write sudo halt.
    I didn't ask though how can I power off my computer but where are the common buttons which do the trick...
    really.. it's the power button.

    hit the power button, and you'll get a popup dialog like usual.
    Our UI designers feel that since the device has a real button for this, adding a software button that duplicates this functionality is duplication and confusion.

  3. #23
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    I KNOW it's the power button! For gods shake!
    For my father wasn't so obvious though and he asked me. I don't know if he is idiot or not but for sure he is not the only one around.
    Your UI it's ultra cool and fantastic. Very professional maiden and practical but some essential small things like this very specific one, makes bad to the overall great experience.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apopas View Post
    I KNOW it's the power button! For gods shake!
    For my father wasn't so obvious though and he asked me. I don't know if he is idiot or not but for sure he is not the only one around.
    Your UI it's ultra cool and fantastic. Very professional maiden and practical but some essential small things like this very specific one, makes bad to the overall great experience.
    I can relate to this, if my mother asked how to turn it off, and I said "use the power button on the computer" she would press the button and keeping it pressed until the computer dies (thi is how the button on the remote to the TV works, and not good for disk syncing).
    I can understand out of a UI-veiw this move, but I know a lot of people who see a boundary between the standard buttons on the keyboard, the short cut buttons, the buttons on the screen (i.e. the software), and all other buttons (I think it was first last year my mother learnt how the "e-mail" shortcut button worked on her laptop she had used for 4 years straight and still double click links in browsers). And for those users the power button on the computer is for starting (even seen the button referred to as the ON-button in manuals/docs aimed at that group of computer users). Nothing else.

    So from a UI-pov, good move, from a user-pov very questionable.
    On the other hand this operating system maybe is aimed just for people who KNOWS computer, and just not uses them to get the work done, or for people who have never got enough computer experience to have those kinds of preconceptions about how stuff works.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Look at the Phoronix Test Suite source. It varies by test and the std variation between runs.
    Hi Michael. I'd like to suggest that you perform some Analysis of Variance to your results, because simply performing however many tests are required to get the standard deviation below a certain threshold is, unfortunately, useless.

    For example, what happens if you do two test runs which happen to produce almost the same average FPS? The PTS just blindly accepts that result as long as it is below the standard deviation threshold, despite the fact that the confidence in that result is totally unknown.

    ANOVA would also allow calculation of confidence intervals which would give meaning to your results. For example, in the Blowfish benchmark, performance varies by only ~1.8% between the top performer MeeGo, and worst performer Moblin. I strongly suspect that this is not a statistically significant result however you "call" it for MeeGo.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by krazy View Post
    Hi Michael. I'd like to suggest that you perform some Analysis of Variance to your results, because simply performing however many tests are required to get the standard deviation below a certain threshold is, unfortunately, useless.

    For example, what happens if you do two test runs which happen to produce almost the same average FPS? The PTS just blindly accepts that result as long as it is below the standard deviation threshold, despite the fact that the confidence in that result is totally unknown.

    ANOVA would also allow calculation of confidence intervals which would give meaning to your results. For example, in the Blowfish benchmark, performance varies by only ~1.8% between the top performer MeeGo, and worst performer Moblin. I strongly suspect that this is not a statistically significant result however you "call" it for MeeGo.
    Getting more statistically correct is always a good thing of course.
    My personal experience is that PTS runs most tests at least three to five times and THEN looks at std dev. Also, from using some of the PTS tests in our regular QA runs, I can say that the tests we use at least are very repeatable, with one big caveat.

    This caveat is that if your OS is having a lot of "background noise", the results will be less stable than when you have a "clean background OS".
    In MeeGo we've mostly succeeded in getting a clean background OS (this is more important for power behavior, but the stable performance is a nice side benefit), and the results are very repeatable. I can imagine that OSes that haven't paid attention to this and/or are very noisy, will see more variability in results...

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: MeeGo Netbook Performance: It's Beating Ubuntu & Co

    The last time we ran a performance comparison of different Linux distributions on netbooks was in late November when benchmarking Chromium OS, Moblin, Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu Netbook Remix. The results were interesting, but now we have a new set of Linux distributions out there, so we have carried out a new comparison. In particular, we are looking closely at how the MeeGo distribution -- which marries Intel's Moblin and Nokia's Maemo projects -- is performing now that it has reached version 1.0. Also in the testing mix are Ubuntu Netbook Remix 10.04 LTS, Moblin 2.1, and Fedora 13.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=14975

    It's an interesting and well done review.


    "... Also in the testing mix are Ubuntu Netbook Remix 10.04 LTS, Moblin 2.1, and Fedora 13."

    Regarding Linux distributions on netbooks, you may have not noticed that there is a new "kid in the city".

    I'm referring to Peppermint OS One, witch had it's first official release at 27/05/2010, as per Distrowatch announcement.

    This is a lightweight LXDE distro,featuring the Openbox WM, based on Debian, Ubuntu and Mint, with many web-based applications, targeting the Netbox users.


    Next opportunity, it would be interesting to see how Peppermint OS compare to the Distros included in the present review.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: MeeGo Netbook Performance: It's Beating Ubuntu & Co

    The last time we ran a performance comparison of different Linux distributions on netbooks was in late November when benchmarking Chromium OS, Moblin, Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu Netbook Remix. The results were interesting, but now we have a new set of Linux distributions out there, so we have carried out a new comparison. In particular, we are looking closely at how the MeeGo distribution -- which marries Intel's Moblin and Nokia's Maemo projects -- is performing now that it has reached version 1.0. Also in the testing mix are Ubuntu Netbook Remix 10.04 LTS, Moblin 2.1, and Fedora 13.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=14975
    Holy Thor! I had missed this article, didn't discover until now!

    Excellent!

    Thanks!

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by arjan_intel View Post
    My personal experience is that PTS runs most tests at least three to five times and THEN looks at std dev.
    Looking at the PTS code, it seems to compute std dev after 2 trials.

    Either way, the example of the Blowfish benchmark in these results is probably not statistically significant although michael claims that meego 'won' it.

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