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Thread: It's Official: Valve Releasing Steam, Source Engine For Linux!

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwistedLincoln View Post
    I'm tired of people acting like DRM is a way of life that can't be helped. It CAN be stopped, but only if we all stop supporting products that impliment it.
    I am tired of idiots that lost sight of why we are against DRM in the first place.

    If it wasn't for Steam, I could have never played Half-Life and thus Counter-Strike up to Source again due to the disk getting lost.

    So why are we against DRM again? Oh wait... I know... because of government intervention with the web. Because of DRM's e-mail that the person who send it could nuke it if he/she wanted it. Because we could not decide what happens with our OS. Because it would... *evil evil evil*

    These are just games. They cost about nothing. Valve has a track record of supporting games for as long as they exist. They said: When Steam goes offline... we'll upload already made patches... etc... etc... etc....

    Stop being such a complete retard and rethink what you are actually whining about. Get Blender, Crystalspace and a r300 graphics card and make your own DRM-less game or something... Oh wait... that's right I recall... how many FLOSS games are succesfull on the premier PC gaming platform? Warsow... OK... and? Well? None!

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Don't like it, don't use it simple as that. What is more important is that you do have a choice vs no choice at all.
    I agree.

    I want to play even with DRM, why should I have not the possibility?

    If u dont want DRM dont install, but dont break the balls to the others..

  3. #83
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    In a sense, I do agree with TwistedLincoln. Steam isn't the optimal choice, and I disagree with a lot of what it stands for (firstly parts of their subscriber agreement); however, Steam on Linux could be the stone that starts an avalanche. With Steam on Linux, Impulse will follow shortly, and then we will see the true Linux gaming at its best.

  4. #84
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    A french video game journalist have contacted valve about linux.
    It seems that the article of the telegraph is a copy/paste of the valve announcement, with the last two lines (about linux), that come from nowhere!!!

    So it seems that journalist of the telegraph just found your site, make is conclusion and then add the two line to his article.

    Wouah.
    Self-inducted news. Better than foxnews. Seriously, stop talking about steam linux, i know that it is really good for website traffic, but destroy quickly your respectability.

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnlemmon View Post
    A french video game journalist have contacted valve about linux.
    It seems that the article of the telegraph is a copy/paste of the valve announcement, with the last two lines (about linux), that come from nowhere!!!

    So it seems that journalist of the telegraph just found your site, make is conclusion and then add the two line to his article.
    How surprising!

  6. #86
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    wooohaa!!!

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    I am tired of idiots that lost sight of why we are against DRM in the first place.

    If it wasn't for Steam, I could have never played Half-Life and thus Counter-Strike up to Source again due to the disk getting lost.

    So why are we against DRM again? Oh wait... I know... because of government intervention with the web. Because of DRM's e-mail that the person who send it could nuke it if he/she wanted it. Because we could not decide what happens with our OS. Because it would... *evil evil evil*

    These are just games. They cost about nothing. Valve has a track record of supporting games for as long as they exist. They said: When Steam goes offline... we'll upload already made patches... etc... etc... etc....

    Stop being such a complete retard and rethink what you are actually whining about. Get Blender, Crystalspace and a r300 graphics card and make your own DRM-less game or something... Oh wait... that's right I recall... how many FLOSS games are succesfull on the premier PC gaming platform? Warsow... OK... and? Well? None!
    Namecalling and personal attacks don't help your argument, but I'll respond anyway...

    I'm not making a conspiracy theorist's argument about the govenrment spying on you via DRM. Nor am I saying that all games must be FLOSS in order to be acceptable. I'm making an entirely logical, practical argument against DRM and Product Activation specifically.

    You say Valve has claimed that when Steam goes offline, they will provide patches to bypass Steam. I haven't heard that, but that's a good thing if that's their plan. But good intentions don't protect consumers -- Valve could one day go bankrupt or be purchased by another company, and be completely unable to make good on this claim.

    It isn't practical or reasonable to expect a company to be able to keep activation servers alive forever. But that doesn't mean that you shouldn't be able to use the product you paid for years from now, long after the company no longer supports it.

    What one pays for a product is immaterial. What matters is that when one buys a product via legal means, they should be able to use it without having to first ask permission. Steam makes this almost totally impossible.

    More on point here is that the "don't like it, don't buy it" attitude won't help. I may never buy a game on Steam for Linux, but as long as other people do, it's a problem. The more successful DRM schemes are, the more other companies will be tempted to impliment them also.

    LGP is a PERFECT example of this. Obviously, they have been reasonably succesful selling games on Linux with DRM. And now comes Valve, releasing more games for Linux with DRM. If this trend continues, it won't be long before almost all proprietary games for Linux use DRM and/or Product Activation, just like is the case on Windows.

    How that helps anybody who likes PC gaming is beyond me.

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    Ok so Phoronix linked back to its own article... Still Michael claims to have a resource, the binary is up for download and it is being worked on. Valve has been using Wine hacks before Crossover came to the Mac...

    That's not Michaels fsck up and a Linux binary is comming.

    So it will come.

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwistedLincoln View Post
    Namecalling and personal attacks don't help your argument, but I'll respond anyway...
    Sorry that I was being a bit harsh on you. It must have been the grown tendency inside of me to start hating it when there are always some people that manage to see (or want to see) something bad, no matter how tiny, when there's something awesome about to happen that totally overwhelms it.

    I'm not making a conspiracy theorist's argument about the govenrment spying on you via DRM. Nor am I saying that all games must be FLOSS in order to be acceptable. I'm making an entirely logical, practical argument against DRM and Product Activation specifically.
    Do you remember the DRM awareness compain a while ago? The FSF protests. The time when the term DRM came about and Vista was to be released? Those where the arguments. I have never said that you said it. What I did say whas the 'we', where 'we' reffers to the people that are against DRM and believe me; I am.

    You say Valve has claimed that when Steam goes offline, they will provide patches to bypass Steam. I haven't heard that, but that's a good thing if that's their plan. But good intentions don't protect consumers -- Valve could one day go bankrupt or be purchased by another company, and be completely unable to make good on this claim.
    Even then I only spend 10 euro's on the entire Half-Life 1 saga, including Counter-Strike, Half-Life Deathmatch, Ritcheco (or what it was called), Team Fortress and the lot and 20 euro's ona a pack of Half-Life2, including Episode 1 and 2, Team Fortress 2, Portal and Counter-Strike Source after that got Half-Life Blue Shift, that 2D Freeman Game and later on free for download GoldenEye: Source and soon to be released for free download Black Mesa: Source.

    The above is 30 euro's. I have downloaded it so much that Valve must have made a loss in me buying these games. 30 euro's in ten years. Everything is still updates and/or available for download. Mods keep comming and Steam keeps improving. I now also have a VOIP app and a messenger app to keep in touch during these games. What Valve has offered for free in downloadable content and feature, graphics and artwork has been massive. Even IF they would go out of business and not release these patches today then it has been SOOOOOOOOO worth it. Now at no extra charge they are porting it to Linux for me (and of course everybody else) which will make sure a shitload of people will be able to dump their 99% proprietary system (minus Firefox) so they can run Linux. Then some guy comes out of nowhere and starts bashing Steam while he doesn't even know that Steam itself also offers content without DRM (it is up to the publishers to decide what to ship with it), for use with GPL'ed software (Duke Nukem 3D, all old id software games). Not to mention will this not spread DRM as you do not have to download it, but will make proprietary Windows to Linux a reality for many and will manage to get Linux a marketshare boost from here 'till Tokyo.

    Yet... Someone... Finds a way... to completely bash it due to DRM that isn't even restricting at all, let aloneenforced on you as you can download GPL software with it.

    It isn't practical or reasonable to expect a company to be able to keep activation servers alive forever. But that doesn't mean that you shouldn't be able to use the product you paid for years from now, long after the company no longer supports it.
    See the above.

    How that helps anybody who likes PC gaming is beyond me.
    Well now you know...

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    ...Then some guy comes out of nowhere and starts bashing Steam while he doesn't even know that Steam itself also offers content without DRM (it is up to the publishers to decide what to ship with it), for use with GPL'ed software (Duke Nukem 3D, all old id software games). .
    I did know that you can use Steam to buy content without DRM encryption. But as far as I've ever seen, you still need the Steam client to reinstall them. Which is tied to your Steam account. Which isn't technically DRM, but it might as well be, as you still rely on a service in order to use your product.

    I just want to buy a physical disc that I can install and use offline if I want. I'd be willing to pay at least double the price in most cases for that ability.

    That's really the rub. If they offered a retail boxed copy that didn't require Steam, and it is just more expensive, I'd have no beef. And yes, I know some games offered on Steam do that . But as a whole, Valve has made the Steam platform about REPLACING physical products, not just supplimenting them. That's why it's so dangerous.

    The analogy would be if a band decided to only release an album via iTunes (back in the days it was using DRM for music, for the purposes of this argument), but not on CD. If the album sold millions of copies anyway, other bands would almost certainly do the same, because they'd have lower costs and more profit. Meanwhile, those of us who want to buy an actual CD would be left in the dark.

    Luckily, that hasn't happened in the music world. People have fought such things hard enough that even Apple dropped DRM for music on iTunes. That was a huge win. Those of us that use GNU/Linux should be pushing Valve to do that same.

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