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Thread: Benchmarks Of The Gentoo-based Sabayon

  1. #31
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    What flags are each and what version of GCC? Can you give the specific times and uname -a?

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apopas View Post
    Well I learnt everything I know about gcc and icc flags and optimizations in general. A source based distro helps a lot there.
    Also, I have not find a benefit yet to use Arch instead of Sabayon which is a binary edition of Gentoo.
    I don't think compilation flags are all that useful. Setting up user accounts, desktop environments, understanding the boot sequence, device detection, the unix philosophy (everything is a file, no output unless something fails, permissions) - that's useful. Gcc/Icc flags, not so much (unless you are a developer) .

    Besides, Arch has AUR which contains packages to build from source, so you get to learn about USE flags and similar stuff anyway.

    As to Sabayon vs Arch... no idea. Maybe a user of both can give some insight to the benefits of either distro, but so far it seems they are about on par to me.

  3. #33
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    a meant average feeling
    Just boot faster, open programs faster, anything is faster
    may be not 25%, but ~10%.
    Anyway, i just like it.
    It gives me the best answer. I started with Debian (Red Hat and Suse failed to stay) and all those little things that were disturbing me, are not there.

    I'm surprised to see that a lot of people using Slack, Arch Gentoo

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apopas View Post
    What flags are each and what version of GCC? Can you give the specific times and uname -a?
    AMD recommended -march=amdfam10 -mabm -msse4a
    Gentoo flags -march=amdfam10 -O2 -pipe
    Default suse flags -O2 -g -m64 -fmessage-length=0 -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 -fstack-protector -funwind-tables -fasynchronous-unwind-tables

    AMD encode time=933 seconds
    Gentoo encode time=950 seconds
    suse defaults=952 seconds

    2.6.31.5-0.1 desktop #1 SMP PREEMPT

    GCC 4.4.2

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    I don't think compilation flags are all that useful. Setting up user accounts, desktop environments, understanding the boot sequence, device detection, the unix philosophy (everything is a file, no output unless something fails, permissions) - that's useful. Gcc/Icc flags, not so much (unless you are a developer) .

    Besides, Arch has AUR which contains packages to build from source, so you get to learn about USE flags and similar stuff anyway.

    As to Sabayon vs Arch... no idea. Maybe a user of both can give some insight to the benefits of either distro, but so far it seems they are about on par to me.
    Through the ABS, it's possible to recompile the whole system from source.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Just for example I just compiled a couple handbrake (and it's supporting libraries which is extremely easy to do since it builds them specifically for hb use) using the recommended gentoo flags for Phenom II's. I then ran the same encode using the prepackaged rpm vs gentoos recommended vs AMD's recommended aggressive flags. Net result was a delta of 2% between the best version (AMD agressive flags) and worst versions (rpm and Gentoo recommended which were within seconds of each other and fall within standard deviation).
    Well, handbrake is rather pointless to use for this since the libraries it uses contains a ton of hand-optimized assembly code for all the time critical parts. So unless you explicitly tells the packages not to use hand-optimized assembly it will be worthless as a comparison between compiler options.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    I don't think compilation flags are all that useful. Setting up user accounts, desktop environments, understanding the boot sequence, device detection, the unix philosophy (everything is a file, no output unless something fails, permissions) - that's useful. Gcc/Icc flags, not so much (unless you are a developer) .
    I find them useful, you don't, while the personal opinion is subjective, the matter of knowledge is objective. Alas if we separate knowledge by usefulness or not.

    Besides, Arch has AUR which contains packages to build from source, so you get to learn about USE flags and similar stuff anyway.
    We had an argument about that once and I gave you the example with Mplayer. Gentoo is much more flexible for compilation. So flexible that you don't even understand that you compile, since it's as automatic as if you run apt-get in Ubuntu.

    As to Sabayon vs Arch... no idea. Maybe a user of both can give some insight to the benefits of either distro, but so far it seems they are about on par to me.
    It is the same with the addition that Sabayon has the flexibility of Gentoo when compilation takes place.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    AMD recommended -march=amdfam10 -mabm -msse4a
    Gentoo flags -march=amdfam10 -O2 -pipe
    Default suse flags -O2 -g -m64 -fmessage-length=0 -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 -fstack-protector -funwind-tables -fasynchronous-unwind-tables

    AMD encode time=933 seconds
    Gentoo encode time=950 seconds
    suse defaults=952 seconds

    2.6.31.5-0.1 desktop #1 SMP PREEMPT

    GCC 4.4.2
    So if I set AMD's recommended flags in my system's variable, probably I'll have an even faster system? Ithink I'll give it a try. That's the Gentoo power

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by XorEaxEax View Post
    Well, handbrake is rather pointless to use for this since the libraries it uses contains a ton of hand-optimized assembly code for all the time critical parts. So unless you explicitly tells the packages not to use hand-optimized assembly it will be worthless as a comparison between compiler options.
    Those libraries are the same libraries that pretty much every encoding application out there uses. The reason I used handbrake because it is very simple to apply the flags across for all the needed libraries. Also to note that over aggressive optimizations often result in slower binaries. My tests were to simply show that going from a base optimizations in x86-64 to "tweaker" flags certianly do not yield a 25% increase in speed and that one set of flags is not universal for best performance system wide.

  10. #40
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    From gcc flags you are not going ofcourse to get 25% boost. But the small advantage you get in combination with the lean system which means less CPU and memory usage you get a bonus which is obvious in some applications, especially games, Firefox etc, boot times, start up times and your desktop in general feels faster.
    The best always is to find a formula to apply different system flags for different parts of the system. For example while I build my system with Gentoo's defaults, my encoders are compiled with O3.

    I run a similar test with lame. Gcc 4.4.2 and Kernel 2.6.32.
    SUSE defaults = 0m35.996s
    Gentoo defaults = 0m35.080s
    Gentoo with O3 = 0m34.928s

    The difference finally is about 3% better performance. Not something exceptional, but why not since I can have it easily? In games the FPS are even higher, especially in opensource games that I compiled myself.
    Also, my system boots in 22 seconds (grub to gdm) plus 8 secs for KDE. Not bad for a 5 years old CPU.
    Also, with Gentoo is easy to use ICC. The results are even better, but I can't since I avoid proprietary apps.
    Last edited by Apopas; 01-04-2010 at 09:12 PM.

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