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Thread: Fedora 11 Released

  1. #1
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    Default Fedora 11 Released

    Phoronix: Fedora 11 Released

    After getting hit by a two last minute delays, the final release of Fedora 11 (codenamed Leonidas) is now available. Red Hat's Paul Frields who leads the Fedora Project has announced its release in the usual creative release announcement. The Fedora 11 release notes are available at FedoraProject.org...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NzMxNA

  2. #2
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    How is it running a 64bit version compared to a 32bit?

    I remember in the beginning there were a lot of bugs in the 64bit versions.

    Have things changed, or they are equally stable?

  3. #3
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    Well, I don't use Fedora since a long time (last was FC-1 ), mostly Gentoo these days and Ubuntu soemtimes. However, everytime a Fedora is released, I feel excited and want to dance joyously on the streets . (Nope, not the case when a new Debian or OpenSuSe is released.) Perhaps every Fedora (especially the recent ones) are way more bleeding edge and/or innovative than contemporary distros and can be truly said as 'new'.

    Congratulations to Fedora . Meanwhile, if I get some time, I'll download and test the Nouveau driver on one of my Nvidia machines.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louise
    ... 64bit version compared to a 32bit?
    Of course they are equally stable.

    Bugs if any are due to 3rd party closed source 32-bit apps. Right now, there are only two of them on my machine - Adobe acrobat reader (acroread) and Skype. However, Skype is rock stable, and Adobe reader is mostly stable.

    A small note of caution. In my opinion, it is better to have at least 1GB of RAM and preferably greater than 2GB for running 64-bit Linux. 64-bit apps seem to take roughly double the amount of RAM than their 32-bit counterparts. Also, my general opinion is that 64-bit seems slightly more heavy than 32-bit (may be just a placebo), but on modern machines, it is all fluid. (I have a desktop with Athlon64 X2 3800+ with 1GB of RAM and it sometimes runs out of RAM during intensive tasks or multitasking with 64-bit. It was something rare in 32-bit. But in general, performance is awesome. But the remaining ones - my notebooks with Core2 T5270 and P8700 and desktops with Core2 E8400 and Phenom X3 8500 are all awesome.)

  5. #5
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    Never cared much about Fedora, but I have to lift my red hat in honour to mr. Frields' astounding presentation. Cheers!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdas View Post
    Of course they are equally stable.
    It is not "of course". If you look in the WINE bugzilla, you will find bugs, that only is present on 64bit systems.

    Other programs have suffered, so I am interested in hearing from people that have tried the early 64 bit distributions, and how they compare with todays.

    Quote Originally Posted by hdas View Post
    A small note of caution. In my opinion, it is better to have at least 1GB of RAM and preferably greater than 2GB for running 64-bit Linux. 64-bit apps seem to take roughly double the amount of RAM than their 32-bit counterparts.
    That most be your imagination. That is not my experience with 64bit RHEL5.3 for server use.

    64bit might take up a little bit more memory, because some of the instructions now are longer.

    If you at Fedora 10 x86 vs A64, the 32bit version DVD iso is 3.4GB and the A64 is 3.9GB.

    I would expect the ratio would be somewhat the same for memory usage.

    Quote Originally Posted by hdas View Post
    Also, my general opinion is that 64-bit seems slightly more heavy than 32-bit (may be just a placebo), but on modern machines, it is all fluid. (I have a desktop with Athlon64 X2 3800+ with 1GB of RAM and it sometimes runs out of RAM during intensive tasks or multitasking with 64-bit. It was something rare in 32-bit. But in general, performance is awesome. But the remaining ones - my notebooks with Core2 T5270 and P8700 and desktops with Core2 E8400 and Phenom X3 8500 are all awesome.)
    64bit should only be faster, when you do float point calculations, on almost other cases, it should actually be a little slower, as you also have experienced.

  7. #7
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    Thumbs down

    I failed to install Fedora 11. It does unhandled exception after choosing keyboard layout so in moment of finding storage devices
    I bet this is stupid bug but i cannot do nothing. I don't use any raid or such stuff. F10 installed flawlessly.

  8. #8
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    Try to rewrite it in a new disk. It happened me once something similar with openSUSE and was fixed in that way.

  9. #9
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    64bit should only be faster, when you do float point calculations..
    Don't you mean large integers?

  10. #10
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    One thing that has always bothered me about recent desktop Linux flavours is the slow Firefox rendering. If there is a static background, scrolling grinds to a halt. Switching tabs is positively glacial. When I try and increase font size, which takes a split second on Windows, it can literally take up to half a minute in Linux. (Especially some fancier/text-heavy Japanese sites.) I surf at 1920x1200, so increasing font sizes is common practice.

    I am currently running Fedora 11 off the live CD and have to say all these problems are fixed in Firefox 3.5. Yay! Okay, not really Fedora specific, but this is the first modern distro in recent history that didn't have a Firefox that felt ten times -- or more -- slower than the same version of Firefox running under WinXP.

    Unfortunately, I'm still having the same sound issues (snap, crackle, hiccup) that have been plaguing me since introduction of Pulseaudio. Yeah...

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