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Thread: Intel Atom On Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE, Mandriva

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  1. #1
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    Default Intel Atom On Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE, Mandriva

    Phoronix: Intel Atom On Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE, Mandriva

    Back in September we looked at the Intel Atom performance on a few Linux distributions using the ASUS Eee PC 901, but now with new stable releases of some of the most popular distributions out in the wild, we've decided to re-conduct these tests. We are using a slightly different Atom-based system this time and we are comparing the performance on Ubuntu 8.10, Fedora 10, Mandriva 2008, and OpenSuSE 11.1.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=13259

  2. #2
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    hi,

    I am very interested in your benchmarks, but I wanted to know if there is any reason not to display a standard deviation in those graphics. (Maybe to know also how many times you have performed the measures would be interesting too).

    I mean, to say:
    ubuntu: 40.5
    fedora: 35.5

    is quite different than:
    ubuntu: 40.5 +/- 20
    fedora: 35.5 +/- 20

    Thanks a lot for your work.
    Bye
    Luca

  3. #3
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    phoronix test suite results shows the deviation

  4. #4
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    Ehm... where? In the graphics in the article?
    thanks

  5. #5
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    As far as I know, only OpenSUSE turns barriers on by default (using ext3). That would explain why it's so much slower in some tests (like the SQLite test), but strangely it makes no difference in IOzone. I guess this could be more a proof of IOzone being a bad benchmark than anything else, since in real world tests barriers do make a big difference when it comes to IO intensive tasks.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luis View Post
    As far as I know, only OpenSUSE turns barriers on by default (using ext3). That would explain why it's so much slower in some tests (like the SQLite test), but strangely it makes no difference in IOzone. I guess this could be more a proof of IOzone being a bad benchmark than anything else, since in real world tests barriers do make a big difference when it comes to IO intensive tasks.
    More then likely beagle (the indexing service) which is enabled by default is the culprit.

  7. #7
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    i have a mainboard with atom 330 (same as atom 230, only dual-core).

    i found fedora to be a bit sluggish (didn't test much). gentoo seems unfeasible at that hardware ;-). archlinux works like a charm.

    aside from that the desktop experience is quite acceptable. but don't hope for playing any recent 3d-intensive games at good framerate.

  8. #8
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    Default Architecture?

    I don't know if other distributions do that too, but Ubuntu has a special architecture named "lpia" with all the packages rebuilt to take advantages of Atom features. So, did you use Ubuntu lpia or Ubuntu x86 for your tests?

  9. #9
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    I have a Lenovo S10e netbook with a non-standard resolution of 1024x576, and i would be very interested to see how completely opensuse 11.1 will install on a netbook.

    1. does the wireless get configured properly
    2. does the webcam get configured properly
    3. is the native resolution easily selectable
    4. how well does the power management work

    regards

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smarter View Post
    I don't know if other distributions do that too, but Ubuntu has a special architecture named "lpia" with all the packages rebuilt to take advantages of Atom features. So, did you use Ubuntu lpia or Ubuntu x86 for your tests?
    From my understanding lpia not only uses different compiler optimizaitons but also some of the software itself is compiled with different options/dependencies.

    It would be interesting to see an i386 ubuntu vs lpia ubuntu comparison -- I might just do this on my aspire one if I get a chance this week.

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