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Thread: DNF Makes It A Step Closer To Replacing Yum On Fedora

  1. #1
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    Default DNF Makes It A Step Closer To Replacing Yum On Fedora

    Phoronix: DNF Makes It A Step Closer To Replacing Yum On Fedora

    DNF 0.6.1 was released today and this updated open-source package manager picked up a few more features as it's still in pursuit of replacing Yum on Fedora systems...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc3NTA

  2. #2
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    Default Subject to change?

    DNF is expected to replace Yum in Fedora 22 but that is still subject to change.

    That hint of doubt worries me. I'm not currently using Fedora. I've used it before, and found that Yum is just too slow - takes at least five times as long as Ubuntu or Debian to install a package. It's been a showstopper for me.

    But overall I like Fedora, and I'm particularly attracted to its security. Selinux by default - that's what I want. Supposedly, one can install Selinux onto Debian, but my attempts to do so haven't gone all that well. Selinux is complicated, and someone has to do the dirty work of setting up policies carefully and testing it with various packages. Red Hat/Fedora has done that - kudos to them.

    So I was seriously considering using Fedora as my main desktop OS, contingent on DNF (or something equivalent) becoming the standard packaging system. I had my hopes up that Fedora 22 would be my future - now I'm a little uncertain. Bummer.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Candide View Post
    DNF is expected to replace Yum in Fedora 22 but that is still subject to change.

    That hint of doubt worries me. I'm not currently using Fedora. I've used it before, and found that Yum is just too slow - takes at least five times as long as Ubuntu or Debian to install a package. It's been a showstopper for me.

    But overall I like Fedora, and I'm particularly attracted to its security. Selinux by default - that's what I want. Supposedly, one can install Selinux onto Debian, but my attempts to do so haven't gone all that well. Selinux is complicated, and someone has to do the dirty work of setting up policies carefully and testing it with various packages. Red Hat/Fedora has done that - kudos to them.

    So I was seriously considering using Fedora as my main desktop OS, contingent on DNF (or something equivalent) becoming the standard packaging system. I had my hopes up that Fedora 22 would be my future - now I'm a little uncertain. Bummer.
    Dnf WILL replace yum at some point. Currently the thought it is 22, but it could slip to 23.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Candide View Post
    DNF is expected to replace Yum in Fedora 22 but that is still subject to change.

    That hint of doubt worries me. I'm not currently using Fedora. I've used it before, and found that Yum is just too slow - takes at least five times as long as Ubuntu or Debian to install a package. It's been a showstopper for me.

    But overall I like Fedora, and I'm particularly attracted to its security. Selinux by default - that's what I want. Supposedly, one can install Selinux onto Debian, but my attempts to do so haven't gone all that well. Selinux is complicated, and someone has to do the dirty work of setting up policies carefully and testing it with various packages. Red Hat/Fedora has done that - kudos to them.

    So I was seriously considering using Fedora as my main desktop OS, contingent on DNF (or something equivalent) becoming the standard packaging system. I had my hopes up that Fedora 22 would be my future - now I'm a little uncertain. Bummer.
    I already use DNF exclusively. I think the biggest things blocking DNF from replacing yum is feature parity rather than instability and showstopper bugs. DNF is quite good already IMO.

  5. #5
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    Default

    i use DNF in F20 on an off. it has its problems at the moment as its not Feature complete compared to YUM but IMO its just as fast as YUM is. it does solve Deps quicker than what YUM does. howver i dont know anything about this new Package in DNF called " dnf-automatic " its in the 0.6.x series . anyone care to explain what it does

  6. #6
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    Default

    Which part of Yum do people find slow? I thought the aim of DNF was better dependency solving not faster speed.

    I've used Fedora for a long time and I find Yum to be completely useable. Maybe its just a case of ignorance is bliss the last time I used APT I had a lot slower internet (dial up.) so no idea what the difference would be nowadays.

    Either way I find it hard to imagine how a slow package manager can be a showstopper unless you are doing something odd. Just how often are you installing packages anyway? I can go months without installing a new package. Updates are irrelevent since they run in background.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt_g View Post
    Which part of Yum do people find slow? I thought the aim of DNF was better dependency solving not faster speed.

    I've used Fedora for a long time and I find Yum to be completely useable. Maybe its just a case of ignorance is bliss the last time I used APT I had a lot slower internet (dial up.) so no idea what the difference would be nowadays.

    Either way I find it hard to imagine how a slow package manager can be a showstopper unless you are doing something odd. Just how often are you installing packages anyway? I can go months without installing a new package. Updates are irrelevent since they run in background.
    DNF has a better dependency resolver but also does things much faster. It is not a showerstopper in the sense that yum is functional and pretty much all the Fedora including 21 is going to use it but when dnf does get feature parity it is likely going to replace it because it is essentially a yum fork + rewrite that does things better.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Candide View Post
    DNF is expected to replace Yum in Fedora 22 but that is still subject to change.

    That hint of doubt worries me. I'm not currently using Fedora. I've used it before, and found that Yum is just too slow - takes at least five times as long as Ubuntu or Debian to install a package. It's been a showstopper for me.

    But overall I like Fedora, and I'm particularly attracted to its security. Selinux by default - that's what I want. Supposedly, one can install Selinux onto Debian, but my attempts to do so haven't gone all that well. Selinux is complicated, and someone has to do the dirty work of setting up policies carefully and testing it with various packages. Red Hat/Fedora has done that - kudos to them.

    So I was seriously considering using Fedora as my main desktop OS, contingent on DNF (or something equivalent) becoming the standard packaging system. I had my hopes up that Fedora 22 would be my future - now I'm a little uncertain. Bummer.
    Your experience may be different from the majority. On my setup updating fedora is way faster than updating ubuntu due to the delta rpm support.

  9. #9
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    Aug 2014
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    Yum can be very slow at times due to a horrible design of its storage backend (/var/lib/yum/yumdb). It keeps tens of thousands of small (few bytes) files there. Reading them for the first time on slowly seeking or busy disk can take a minute or two. Last time I've checked dnf didn't change that. Fortunately since I've upgraded to SSD it's fast and doesn't annoy me anymore.

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