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Thread: Darksiders Has Been Ported To Linux

  1. #71
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    Default Thank you!

    Unfortunately, everybody is talking here only about Steam, DRM and such things. But we forget the actual reason for this thread: an effort of porting another cool game for GNU/Linux. In the name of all gamers, I would like to thank Leszek and everybody else, who was involved in this work. Thank you guys and I'm very glad, that you give us one less reason to reboot into Windows

    I already bought Darksiders once (a couple of time ago), but as for now Steam doesn't give an opportunity to install it on GNU/Linux. I think, this is because this game is not yet officially available yet, right? Or am I doing something wrong?

  2. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by scorp View Post
    Unfortunately, everybody is talking here only about Steam, DRM and such things. But we forget the actual reason for this thread: an effort of porting another cool game for GNU/Linux. In the name of all gamers, I would like to thank Leszek and everybody else, who was involved in this work. Thank you guys and I'm very glad, that you give us one less reason to reboot into Windows

    I already bought Darksiders once (a couple of time ago), but as for now Steam doesn't give an opportunity to install it on GNU/Linux. I think, this is because this game is not yet officially available yet, right? Or am I doing something wrong?
    ^ This, i have the game in steam but i have not even played it cause i don't want to use windows to try some game i got free with my AMD Phenom II x4 965 back in 2011, i tired messing with it in wine and i never really bothered for some reason really trying to use it after i spent a week or more downloading it over some really crappy DSL

    i think you are right about it not being officially available

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee. View Post
    Pirating windows doesn't give money to Microsoft.
    But it still helps Microsoft as it increases their dominance in the market by promoting brand recognition:
    http://arstechnica.com/information-t...ose-microsoft/

    Quote Originally Posted by dee. View Post
    By the same logic, the same thing happens if you use windows software via wine. In the real world though, sometimes people need to run a program that is only available for windows, maybe because of their jobs or whatever.
    Yes, it does, which is why WINE is both a blessing and a curse and should only be used sparingly. Supporting native software is the much better option.

    I actually agreed with most else you had to say, but I still do not believe piracy is a legitimate way to protest against DRM.

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyber Killer View Post
    BTW: this made me realize back then that we have a problem with backwards compatibility on GNU/Linux, we can't rely on maintainers to keep the software updated until the end of days. This is something we need to start caring about, especially now, that we start getting many 3rd party software like games (yes, most of them ship with needed libs, but not all of them, e.g. almost nobody bundles libstdc and many that do find that it causes problems). (note: the official GNU/Linux port of Unreal Tournament 2004, that was on the game discs, no longer installs/runs despite being not that old :-( )
    And yet I am still running the original UT on a modern Arch Linux install...

    This is an often stated complaint but it is not nearly as large a problem as some people claim - getting old games running is fairly trivial for those that are knowledgeable about how they work and what accommodations need to be made, and I have had great success in getting old Linux binaries loaded on modern machines.

    As for UT2004, there are already easy installers that allow for a simple install on modern Linux distributions:
    http://www.liflg.org/?catid=6&gameid=17

    GoG on Windows has had to do much of the same things to get old Windows games running.

    In the long run the solution is to have proper source code access though, because that is the only true way to allow a game to be truly playable indefinitely.
    Last edited by Hamish Wilson; 07-14-2014 at 01:06 PM.

  5. #75
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    I hope its performance won't be like Painkiller, which takes ages to load and has inconsistent performance.

  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
    But it still helps Microsoft as it increases their dominance in the market by promoting brand recognition:
    http://arstechnica.com/information-t...ose-microsoft/
    Possibly, yes. It sort of depends though - if you absolutely have to use a windows program, then it doesn't matter much if you use it on pirated windows, WINE or ReactOS... if we take it as given that the windows binary has to be ran in some way, the actual method used isn't relevant wrt. microsoft brand recognition.

    Yes, it does, which is why WINE is both a blessing and a curse and should only be used sparingly. Supporting native software is the much better option.
    Of course it is, but that's an ideal that isn't always possible to realize in real world settings.

    I actually agreed with most else you had to say, but I still do not believe piracy is a legitimate way to protest against DRM.
    I'm not really advocating piracy as a means of protest for anyone. Personally, I'll rather just skip any games that use DRM - I don't really have that big of a need to play the latest FPS on rails... I can understand the viewpoint though: games, like other media, are part of our culture, and as such, people should have the right to experience that culture without surrendering their civil rights - and it could be argued that DRM violates civil rights by forcefully taking the control of hardware from the user.

    Regardless - like I said, I don't really advocate piracy, but I do still appreciate it, as it is currently the only thing creating balance against the copyright maximalists. Simply framing the issue as "theft is wrong, therefore piracy is wrong" is ignoring all the social and political issues that are entwined in it.

  7. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by scorp View Post
    Unfortunately, everybody is talking here only about Steam, DRM and such things. But we forget the actual reason for this thread: an effort of porting another cool game for GNU/Linux. In the name of all gamers, I would like to thank Leszek and everybody else, who was involved in this work. Thank you guys and I'm very glad, that you give us one less reason to reboot into Windows

    I already bought Darksiders once (a couple of time ago), but as for now Steam doesn't give an opportunity to install it on GNU/Linux. I think, this is because this game is not yet officially available yet, right? Or am I doing something wrong?
    Quote Originally Posted by pqwoerituytrueiwoq View Post
    ^ This, i have the game in steam but i have not even played it cause i don't want to use windows to try some game i got free with my AMD Phenom II x4 965 back in 2011, i tired messing with it in wine and i never really bothered for some reason really trying to use it after i spent a week or more downloading it over some really crappy DSL

    i think you are right about it not being officially available
    Thanks for the kind words.

    Yeah, not released yet. Game is currently in QA.

  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee. View Post
    I know what your statement was "aimed at". It's bullshit, your argument hinges on the assumption that all license violations are equal.

    Licenses are not equal, neither are license violations. A license is nothing but a contract, and contracts are limited to what they can obligate you to. For instance, even if you sign a contract where you agree to be someone's slave for the rest of your life, that doesn't mean you actually have to do it because such a contract is not valid, a person's personal freedom cannot be taken away by a contract. A contract cannot obligate you to harm yourself. The things a contract (or license) are allowed to obligate you to are defined by law, and those laws can also be changed and modified, like all laws.

    One can see GPL and other such licenses as being valid, while seeing the terms of an EULA that forbid breaking the DRM or sharing the binary with your friends as invalid. You might disagree with that point of view but it's not hypocrisy... I'm not commenting on the validity of such a view, but the view is not inconsistent with itself so it is by definition not hypocrisy.
    Thanks, this is exactly what I wanted to see from you.
    What you are actually saying here is: "I, dee. from the Phoronix forum, declare myself as the one that decides which licenses are valid and which not. My position as decider includes of course the right to tell the developers/publishers 'Fuck you!' if I deem a license as not compatible with my worldview and entitles me to totally break that license and declare it OK for anyone else to do the same, of course with declaring higher moral ground instead of just calling it what it is: a crime. However, if you dare to break the licenses that I like you are totally evil. And of course I am not a hypocrite, I just have a different opinion.
    Also, my comparisons of slaves (being forced to something) with DRM (where you can decide if you want the product or not with looking at the terms of usage before doing so totally sucks."

    That you don't like a law entitles you in no way to not being held accountable for breaking it. If you want it changed become a politician and try to do so, or support politicians that do so.

    Why is it that those people that think they stand on a moral ground have absolutely no problems with breaking what they stand for when suddenly something is not like they want it to have?

    Anyways, my opinion that you are a hypocrite, troll and zealot still stands, I think you have that shown more than enough. In conclusion I will put you to my ignore list, people like you are not worth the time wasted reading your comments.

  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vim_User View Post
    What you are actually saying here is:
    Oh hey, we get to do that now? Cool!

    What you are actually saying is: "I'm an impotent brain moron whose fragile self-esteem hinges on being able to convince myself of always being right at internet arguments".

    Aren't we having fun!

    Anyways, my opinion that you are a hypocrite, troll and zealot still stands, I think you have that shown more than enough. In conclusion I will put you to my ignore list, people like you are not worth the time wasted reading your comments.
    > is unable to make a single argument without resorting to strawmen and hyperbolic mischaracterization of the opposing arguments
    > calls other people trolls

    > is unable to ever admit being wrong about anything
    > calls other people zealots

    > after all this, calls other people hypocrites

    Yeah... Vim_user, you don't have very much self-awareness, do you?

  10. #80
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    Default

    I dont agree with Vim_User on this matter but I am not going to add him to an ignore list because

    a) I agree with his arguments against that strange guy with a BSD shaped chip on his shoulder.
    b) I dont know how.
    c) I am also a vim user.

    However I will add that there are laws in place that I simply will not agree with

    1) Net neutrality being put in the hands of corporations
    2) Encryption only allowed in certain countries
    3) Jailbreaking devices is illegal in some countries
    4) The church does not need to conform to the same equality laws as other companies
    5) Anti-piracy (until DRM is abolished! Takes two to tango and all that...)

    These laws were not put in place by "lawmakers", since they are not knowledgable in the relevant areas. Instead these laws were put in place by corporations that will obviously create unfair laws to suit them.

    So when it comes to computers and the internet (and in some countries piracy isnt even illegal), these "laws" (except #4) are little more than terms of use. Since font rendering in Linux compatability is pretty bad. I generally can't read that anyway. Besides, who made terms of use a legal requirement anyway? The terms of use consortium.. thats who!

    And since the word slavery has been brought up in this thread... need I remind you that the road to abolishing slavery in 1865 did not happen by people just following the completely incorrect and idiotic laws of the time. No, instead they torrented a sh*t load from the Pirate Bay out of protest!

    But that said, I do give back! I make sure to click on every single tacky advert on the Pirate Bay (perhaps contributing to their US$1.4M a year).

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