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Thread: Antergos: An Easy, Quick Way To Try Out Arch Linux

  1. #21
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    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaprikawn View Post
    I agree whole-heartedly. I'm just saying that installing Arch typically does not take 15 minutes and is not straight forward.

    When I installed Arch recently, I wanted btrfs, and did exactly what you said. I went into the wiki and read the article on btrfs. I read about what programs can format a disk to btrfs, I read about how using btrfs affects grub for both bios and uefi configurations, I read about how formatting to btrfs is different to formatting to ext4 and the rest with regards to partitioning. Basically I read a tonne of stuff about btrfs, and just reading about btrfs added more than 15 minutes to the install time in itself.
    If you want BTRFS you obviously want it for its advanced features like snapshotting or dynamic resizing of volumes. All those features are exposed as terminal commands so why use a GUI to set up BTRFS. You need to learn about it anyway. For anything else just slapping ext4 on 1-2 partitions with mkfs is enough.

  2. #22
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    Mar 2013
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    I'm looking forward for the arch/antergos benchmarks. By they way many people say that arch is faster, and what I have seen is that debian distros distribute many binaries with debugging symbols while arch binaries are stripped from those.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    As a Arch user, this is what I'd do for benchmarks:

    - Install Arch once and keep it up to date.
    - Set up fstab to use UUIDs.
    - Set up NetworkManager.

    Now every time I needed to run a benchmark on a new system, I'd:

    - Move the drive (or an image of it) to each new machine to benchmark.
    - Set up BIOS/EFI to boot from the Arch drive.
    - Boot using the fallback kernel.
    - Log-in, run sudo mkinitcpio -p linux
    - Reboot, choose the default kernel.
    - Run benchmarks.

    No need to install, and it probably is faster to setup than installing any distro.

  4. #24
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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    FTFY.
    1) gdisk/fdisk
    2) mkfs.ext4
    4) mnt /dev/sda1 /mnt
    Implying you don't use any advanced disk setup, i.e. RAID or LVM2
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    3) pacstrap -i /mnt base base-devel gnome nvidia syslinux
    4) genfstab
    5) arch-chroot
    6) syslinux-install_update
    7) create user
    8) touch 4 config files for localization, hostname, time, bootmanager config
    Touching them is not enough in most cases, you actually have to put in some data. touch just creates empty files.
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    9) Enable NetworkManager and GDM
    10) Done.
    Well, now you have an english version of GNOME running. So what do you do next? You can surf the web. Want to play an MP3? Well, good luck without appropriate gstreamer plugins. Visit a website that uses flash? Doesn't work. Watch a video? Well, it works if you're lucky, but you are lacking VDPAU so no hardware acceleration for you, buddy. I also always recommend something for synchronizing your clock to an NTP server. And if you have a notebook, you might possibly want to install even more stuff, like bluez, bumblebee, ModemManager, you name it, and Arch offers no way to easily install all that in a way that can be described as non-basic. I like Arch and there is not a single machine I own that can but doesn't run Arch, but the I regard the claim that it can be installed in 10 minutes (even 30 minutes) as not true if you mean any more than "create a machine that provides some form of login". I don't run Arch because it is installed quickly, but because it is highly flexible - granted, Gentoo is better in that regard -, offers very good and very few distro-specific tools (like pacman), has cutting-edge software in its repositories, a competent community, it's rolling release and well-designed. I don't need Arch to be installed fast because I do it once per machine. If you actually want to install it multiple times in the same environment, the tools to automate it are all there.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    796

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    Quote Originally Posted by Laser View Post
    Implying you don't use any advanced disk setup, i.e. RAID or LVM2

    Touching them is not enough in most cases, you actually have to put in some data. touch just creates empty files.

    Well, now you have an english version of GNOME running. So what do you do next? You can surf the web. Want to play an MP3? Well, good luck without appropriate gstreamer plugins. Visit a website that uses flash? Doesn't work. Watch a video? Well, it works if you're lucky, but you are lacking VDPAU so no hardware acceleration for you, buddy. I also always recommend something for synchronizing your clock to an NTP server. And if you have a notebook, you might possibly want to install even more stuff, like bluez, bumblebee, ModemManager, you name it, and Arch offers no way to easily install all that in a way that can be described as non-basic. I like Arch and there is not a single machine I own that can but doesn't run Arch, but the I regard the claim that it can be installed in 10 minutes (even 30 minutes) as not true if you mean any more than "create a machine that provides some form of login". I don't run Arch because it is installed quickly, but because it is highly flexible - granted, Gentoo is better in that regard -, offers very good and very few distro-specific tools (like pacman), has cutting-edge software in its repositories, a competent community, it's rolling release and well-designed. I don't need Arch to be installed fast because I do it once per machine. If you actually want to install it multiple times in the same environment, the tools to automate it are all there.
    I didn't mean the command touch. I meant edit/modify. MP3 -> VLC. Flash? Who uses flashplugin? Just use Chrome comes with its own flashplayer or install pepper-flash for chromium. Who needs hardware acceleration for youtube video? Even with the real adobe flashplugin that's unstable a hell if you override the setting in /etc/mms.conf. How is that Arch Linux's fault? Synchronizing the clock? Systemd got you covered with systemd-timesycnd. Would you have your favorite apps already installed on Ubuntu? No you'd still delete the preinstalled stuff install alternatives. Install dropbox etc. That's a pretty poor argument. Of course you can have full working Arch desktops with your favorite apps in 20 minutes.
    Last edited by blackout23; 06-24-2014 at 01:20 PM.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    I didn't mean the command touch. I meant edit/modify.
    Well, that's not "touching" a file…
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    MP3 -> VLC.
    Well, I'd never consider using VLC for MP3 or any media that another player plays, but this is just personal preference, but it wasn't included in your initial pacman list.
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    Flash? Who uses flashplugin?
    Never said anything about flashplugin.
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    Just use Chrome comes with its own flashplayer or install pepper-flash for chromium.
    I use the latter, but both chrome and pepper-flash require you to use the AUR and setting that up needs some work as well if you want to do it convenient (editing your makepkg.conf, installing ccache, sometimes setting up distcc…) so there is actually some more work to do, and I as twitch.tv user actually need flash.
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    Who needs hardware acceleration for youtube video?
    I don't need it (in fact I have it disabled right now due to bugs with the driver from git) but I prefer not hearing the fan when I watch videos in my browser.
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    Even with the real adobe flashplugin that's unstable a hell if you override the setting in /etc/mms.conf.
    I'm not considering flashplugin cause it is crap, I have it installed for steam only.
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    How is that Arch Linux's fault?
    Dunno, I can't remember using the word "fault".[/quote]Synchronizing the clock? Systemd got you covered with systemd-timesycnd. Would you have your favorite apps already installed on Ubuntu? No you'd still delete the preinstalled stuff install alternatives.[/quote]Well, but I think many Ubuntu users just use the default applications, and if not, this can be considered additional time to install it. I wasn't comparing Arch to different distros primarily, but to the claim that it can be installed in under an hour.
    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    Install dropbox etc. That's a pretty poor argument. Of course you can have full working Arch desktops with your favorite apps in 20 minutes.
    Or even less if you have written a shell script before actually starting your boot disk! But that is not the usual install case for me, it's rather a new machine with a custom configuration.

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