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Thread: Antergos: An Easy, Quick Way To Try Out Arch Linux

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Default Antergos: An Easy, Quick Way To Try Out Arch Linux

    Phoronix: Antergos: An Easy, Quick Way To Try Out Arch Linux

    I decided to give Antergos a whirl to see how this Arch Linux variant works. For those pressed for time or looking at an easy path for setting up an Arch Linux installation, Antergos seems to get the job done well.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=20637

  2. #2

    Default #SOLVED# Cnchi installer issue (Graphic installer)

    Hello,

    You will find in the release 16.06.2014 of Antergos an issue on the Graphic Installer, but you can still make the clean perfect install that Antergos distro offers using the Graphical Installer.
    For this matter I place a link found in Antergos forum of how to address this issue (it is a installer update).


    http://forum.antergos.com/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1846


    Thanks and Regards.

    Dhiego Silva.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    131

    Default

    You should add Kaosx to the benchmarks, that distro its suppose to be very optimized (only qt, kde and 64 bits, and its not based in any distro), so it should be faster.
    In relation with antergos, it looks good, but its difficult to install it if your internet connection is slow.

  4. #4
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    Default

    ArchLinux isn't for you if you have no intention to fiddle with a few config files. Simple as that

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by siavashserver View Post
    ArchLinux isn't for you if you have no intention to fiddle with a few config files. Simple as that
    I feel that it is more an issue of understanding what all the packages in an Arch Linux system do, since you have maintain your own system, and being able to use command line utilities. Config files generally have good defaults, and modifying them during installation is minimal (not to say installation itself is "minimal," which is the other issue).

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by siavashserver View Post
    ArchLinux isn't for you if you have no intention to fiddle with a few config files. Simple as that
    Yes and no: I'm a sysadmin and software developer, but having to install Linux on several machines with different hardware I'm grateful the Antergos installer gives me a working Arch system in a few minutes, that I can then tweak to my liking (and completely customize fiddling with config files for my home pc).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Default The installer do not allow GPT partitioned disks

    Manjaro allows GPT partitioned disks, the Antergos Installer still do not.

    Antergos is pure arch, but with a good installer

    You can test rolling releases as them, Manjaro and Antergos, in this case publish ISOs so you can test only the ISOs versions or to pair it with Ubuntu that is 50% of GNU pairing their current versions at Ubuntu launches nobody would blame you for making the trick to take Ubuntu launching date as benchmark vs "the world" as it is that day

    YES YOU CAN benchmark, at least twice a year , when Ubuntu launches Ubuntu vs the world, Fedora, openSUSE, Manjaro, Antergos, KAOS, Chakra, Slackware, Solyd and Sabayon, at the point they are making the date of reference the ubuntu launch day.

    Even more, if you do, and some other publish it, be sure that non Rolling Releases distributions would work to be specially fine at that 2 dates

    I have Xubuntu and Manjaro installed, Half Life 2 Lost Coast test gave me at 720p with my new NVIDIA GTX 750 Ti that I am very happy with, 100 fps in Xubuntu fully updated and and 150 fps at Manjaro 3.14, and I think it was not only the newer kernel.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by halo9en View Post
    Yes and no: I'm a sysadmin and software developer, but having to install Linux on several machines with different hardware I'm grateful the Antergos installer gives me a working Arch system in a few minutes, that I can then tweak to my liking (and completely customize fiddling with config files for my home pc).
    Indeed, installing Arch from scratch takes a few hours (mostly RTFMing.)

    That said, I've been using the same Arch installation for >4 years now on a dozen systems. Whenever I get a new system, such as the rMBP I am using right now, I simply boot the Arch installer, create a new EXT4 partition and tar-copy a working installation from a different system. Then it's simply a matter of chrooting into the freshly copied installation and running grub-install.

    Takes about 10 minutes when using gigabit ethernet or an external USB3 disk.

    If I am feeling especially lazy, I use an Ubuntu LiveUSB or VirtualBox (raw partition) to perform the file copy. This way I can keep using the system during the file copy.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    Indeed, installing Arch from scratch takes a few hours (mostly RTFMing.)
    http://www.overclock.net/a/how-to-in...k-and-dirt-way

    took about 20 minutes first time i tried
    less than 10 minutes on last iteration
    it my preferred arch install "cheatsheet"

    usually i run a manjaro as main desktop/work horse, but i like a headless server to toy with things, it's much easier to get stuff working like a (r|d)ecent nodejs or mariaDB version straight out of AUR, without the fuss. so, if anybody wants to take it for a spin....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    Indeed, installing Arch from scratch takes a few minutes.
    FTFY.
    1) gdisk/fdisk
    2) mkfs.ext4
    4) mnt /dev/sda1 /mnt
    3) pacstrap -i /mnt base base-devel gnome nvidia syslinux
    4) genfstab
    5) arch-chroot
    6) syslinux-install_update
    7) create user
    8) touch 4 config files for localization, hostname, time, bootmanager config
    9) Enable NetworkManager and GDM
    10) Done.

    Voila fully working desktop in 5-15 minutes (dependig on your download speed) with 10-15 commands.
    Don't get it why people make their life hard and install everything seperately (xorg, gnome, driver etc.). If you want a desktop install it and everything that's needed will get pulled in anyway and -i allows you to even make customizations to the package group defaults along the way.
    Last edited by blackout23; 06-24-2014 at 04:30 AM.

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