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Thread: Intel Might Finally Have Linux Frame-Buffer Compression Fixed-Up, On By Default

  1. #1
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    Default Intel Might Finally Have Linux Frame-Buffer Compression Fixed-Up, On By Default

    Phoronix: Intel Might Finally Have Linux Frame-Buffer Compression Fixed-Up, On By Default

    For years the open-source Intel Linux graphics driver developers have been working on frame-buffer compression (FBC) support but never it's worked out quite good enough to turn it on by default in full. Frame-buffer compression has the ability to reduce power consumption for those using Intel HD Graphics while reducing the amount of memory bandwidth used for screen refreshes. Now though the Intel DRM FBC code has been re-worked and perhaps this time it will be flipped on by default...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcyMzg

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    With the patches, Ville is trying to enable Intel frame-buffer compression support by default for Intel "Ironlake" hardware and newer.
    And what about "older" hardware?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BubuXP View Post
    And what about "older" hardware?
    Ironlake is ancient. It was the first version of a chip that combines the gpu and cpu on the same die. There's no point in going back further.

    I actually threw away my old laptop with Ironlake last week. It had become a pain in the ass, so I threw it away and moved to do everything at home on my tablet. I feel blessed.

  4. #4
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    June: Man abandons laptop, plans to do everything on tablet.
    July: Said tablet has been shot, ran over, hit with a hammer, burned, and ashes distributed in seven locations. Order for new laptop placed.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anarchy View Post
    Ironlake is ancient. It was the first version of a chip that combines the gpu and cpu on the same die.
    Actually it's not. There are two chips, therefore also two names - Clarkdale/Arrandale (CPU) and Ironlake (GPU). Sandy Bridge is the first combined chip.

    Also, I would not call it ancient - my older desktop is Clarkdale+Ironlake, and the CPU is still very nice. But it is true that Intel has moved on from it, leaving behind quite an incomplete Ironlake driver, which is a shame. Heck, Sandy Bridge barely gets any attention anymore.

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