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Thread: Approved: Fedora 22 Will Replace Yum With DNF

  1. #1
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    Default Approved: Fedora 22 Will Replace Yum With DNF

    Phoronix: Approved: Fedora 22 Will Replace Yum With DNF

    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee has gone ahead and improved the feature request of replacing Yum with DNF for the Fedora 22 release likely to happen in the first half of 2015...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcyMzc

  2. #2
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    Cool, I use it on F20 every day already!

  3. #3
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    Default What are the advantages of DNF?

    Quote Originally Posted by froyo View Post
    Cool, I use it on F20 every day already!
    I use Yum every day on F20, and I don't notice any yawning chasm in my life because of that. So what is the reason for replacing something that is already working fine?

  4. #4
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    Anybody knows what will happen to yumex?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisr View Post
    So what is the reason for replacing something that is already working fine?
    Speed!

  6. #6
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    heh, quite bad/funny choice of abbreviation for package manager. From sport DNF aka did not finish. Does it mean packages might fail to install

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisr View Post
    I use Yum every day on F20, and I don't notice any yawning chasm in my life because of that. So what is the reason for replacing something that is already working fine?
    Backwards in-compatible changes, such as finally dropping depreciated API's, also they are ripping out the backends and replacing them with cross-distro libraries. As far as actual new features its mostly a big speed increase because the new backends are a lot faster.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuke81 View Post
    heh, quite bad/funny choice of abbreviation for package manager. From sport DNF aka did not finish. Does it mean packages might fail to install

    Its Duke Nukem Forever, you insensitive clod!

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisr View Post
    So what is the reason for replacing something that is already working fine?
    Most of the changes are invisible to the user, since DNF is *mostly* compatible with Yum. It's essentially a rewrite of the code with several objectives - to make it quicker and more efficient, to provide better APIs for other tools (like GUIs) to use, and to make the codebase easier to maintain in future so as to permit new features to be added (such as better support for optional dependencies).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Default Fedora developers agree with me

    I think it was about a week or two ago when I made a brief comment about how I liked Fedora but was sticking with Debian because:

    1) Some important packages I use are not in the Fedora repositories, and...

    2) YUM is annoyingly slow when compared to apt-get

    On point number 2, I got flamed pretty bad. Total denial, of course "YUM is just as fast as apt-get!!! Blah! Blah!

    Not being a sensitive soul, I just ignored it. But I'm enjoying seeing that apparently Fedora's developers agree with me, and want to replace YUM with something faster.

    However, I'm not patting myself on the back for my brilliant revelation that YUM is slow. I'm probably about the millionth person to have noticed this problem and commented about it. YUM has been around for like, what, 10 years? I was seeing comments about YUM being slow within days of its first release.

    Anyway, I am really glad that Fedora developers are planning to fix this, and I look forward to the version 22 release. I would certainly be happy enough to go back to Fedora, provided somebody makes those missing packages. So while I'm on this topic, maybe I should ask: "How does one request Fedora developers to make a package?" One that I particularly need but couldn't find is "Aegisub."

    I also had no luck getting Google Earth to run under Fedora 64-bit (even under Debian it wasn't a straightforward installation, but it was doable.)

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