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Thread: Unicode 7.0 Adds A Lot Of New Characters

  1. #1
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    Default Unicode 7.0 Adds A Lot Of New Characters

    Phoronix: Unicode 7.0 Adds A Lot Of New Characters

    The Unicode 7.0 standard was announced yesterday and adds 2,834 characters...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcyMjE

  2. #2
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    can these too be used for passwords? XD

  3. #3
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    Well, probably.
    Also check this thread http://lists.x.org/archives/xorg-dev...ne/042831.html

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat2 View Post
    Well, probably.
    Also check this thread http://lists.x.org/archives/xorg-dev...ne/042831.html
    Haha, that is awesome.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakubo View Post
    can these too be used for passwords? XD
    Some of them could, but there are things that have to be taken in to account when you design a system that supports such passwords: www.unicode.org/reports/tr31/, http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr36/ (and most notably http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr36/#Text_Comparison). The issues are mainly associated with Unicode Normalization and Case Folding. You might also have problems typing in when you don't have a localized keyboard. In some languages collation (comparison) is done differently from what you'd expect in your language (e.g. 'v' and 'w' are considered equal when compared in Swedish). In the end, having Unicode characters in your password does not bring any benefit other than making dictionary attacks harder or making your password longer in bytes (since Unicode encodings use an equal or larger amount of bytes to represent code points, e.g. with UTF-8 if you used 4 Cyrillic characters your password would be 8 bytes because of the encoding and with 4 Chinese characters it would probably be 12 bytes). So if you are trying to defend yourself against a brute-force attack you are no better then if you were using more ASCII characters. In my opinion its a lot of work for a little gain.
    They added the Ruble Sign - no more reinventing the wheel. At least when everybody update their fonts and software not to ignore it though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat2 View Post
    Well, probably.
    Also check this thread http://lists.x.org/archives/xorg-dev...ne/042831.html
    Oh man imagine the potential this has with fingerprint readers. It might be a pain and/or security risk to attempt to generate the password every time you need to log in, but if a fingerprint reader can do it all for you, then you've basically got an un-crackable password while still being potentially easy to memorize.

  7. #7
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    Unicode: we add dead languages with no speakers and only partially known charsets, but ignore Klingon and Quenya with active speakers and fully known charsets.

  8. #8
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    Too bad there are no fonts that could display Unicode. Even the larger ones cover only a small part of it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    Too bad there are no fonts that could display Unicode. Even the larger ones cover only a small part of it.
    Some fonts are locale-specific, e.g. some of the CJK Unified Ideographs are supposed to be rendered differently Chinese and Japanese systems even though they are assigned the same code point. 'Noto' project is promising https://code.google.com/p/noto/ because they plan to support all living scripts by the end of 2014. There are also some useful resources here http://www.unicode.org/resources/fonts.html.

    http://unicode-table.com/ site uses Universalia font which seems to have a good coverage and I use it as a fall back font in Ubuntu.

  10. #10
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    Emoji = bloat.

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