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Thread: Systemd 213 Adds A Time Sync Daemon

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    Default Systemd 213 Adds A Time Sync Daemon

    Phoronix: Systemd 213 Adds A Time Sync Daemon

    The latest update to systemd is now available and it adds a lot more functionality to the system management daemon...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcwMzM

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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: Systemd 213 Adds A Time Sync Daemon

    The latest update to systemd is now available and it adds a lot more functionality to the system management daemon...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcwMzM
    Is this brand new development or adopting/adapting something like Chrony under the systemd umbrella?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinN View Post
    Is this brand new development or adopting/adapting something like Chrony under the systemd umbrella?
    It's a new SNTP (not NTP) client. Chrony is a full-featured NTP client and server for use cases where very accurate clock skew is a requirement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by strcat View Post
    It's a new SNTP (not NTP) client. Chrony is a full-featured NTP client and server for use cases where very accurate clock skew is a requirement.
    thanks. wasnt aware of the distinction (SNTP vs NTP).

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    Quote Originally Posted by strcat View Post
    Chrony is a full-featured NTP client and server for use cases where very accurate clock skew is a requirement.
    Now you are describing ntpd. Chrony is only useful in cases where you don't have 24/7 internet, but still want to have some kind of serious synchronization going.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinN View Post
    thanks. wasnt aware of the distinction (SNTP vs NTP).
    The "S" stands for "Simple." If you need constant accuracy use NTP. If you only need intermittent updates use Chrony or systemd-timesyncd.

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    Default newsflash

    Systemd 2048 Adds ssh shell server
    ...
    Systemd 16383 Adds full featured X-server
    ...

    A new computing paradigm is emerging which claims to better and results in less crashes than Microsft Systemd. The paradigm seems to be based of a much older paradigm, since long deemed inpractical. The new computing paradigm is called KISSS, which seems to be an acronym for "Keep It Simple and Stupid, you Stupid!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ardje View Post
    Now you are describing ntpd. Chrony is only useful in cases where you don't have 24/7 internet, but still want to have some kind of serious synchronization going.
    Chrony is lighter than ntpd despite offering some additional features.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ardje View Post
    Systemd 2048 Adds ssh shell server
    ...
    Systemd 16383 Adds full featured X-server
    ...

    A new computing paradigm is emerging which claims to better and results in less crashes than Microsft Systemd. The paradigm seems to be based of a much older paradigm, since long deemed inpractical. The new computing paradigm is called KISSS, which seems to be an acronym for "Keep It Simple and Stupid, you Stupid!"
    All seperate daemons, all separate binaries. Systemd: Umbrella Project, like Apache, not Systemd PID1... Troll argument is troll

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericg View Post
    All seperate daemons, all separate binaries. Systemd: Umbrella Project, like Apache, not Systemd PID1... Troll argument is troll
    The various *BSD operating systems are a good comparison, since the kernel and core userspace are developed in a single repository, and systemd aims to provide the core userspace of an operating system.

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