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Thread: Intel Launches The Z97 Chipset

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    Default Intel Launches The Z97 Chipset

    Phoronix: Intel Launches The Z97 Chipset

    Today the NDA clears covering Intel's new Z97 and H97 chipsets, which are targeted for the Haswell-Refresh CPUs along with Broadwell CPUs later in the year...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY4NzQ

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    […] and Intel Device Protection Technology with Boot Guard for protecting the boot block against malware attacks.
    Please do your own research before quoting marketing (and possibly dangerous) stuff like that. You do that often enough already.

    […] plus reviews of the new Intel CPUs as soon as we're allowed, […]
    So you have unrelased CPUs?

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    "There are more refreshed Haswell CPUs on the way, including a Devil's Canyon variant with an improved thermal interface material optimized for overclocking. Intel tells us this K-series chip may not be compatible with some 8-series motherboards, suggesting Devil's Canyon could include other changes under the hood. Tweaking the TIM alone seems unlikely to affect mobo compatibility, though we're told most Z87 boards should work with the chip."

    -- http://techreport.com/review/26443/t...series-chipset

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    it looked like ssd speed could go up by about 20% using the new form factor. but that may be able to double at a later date and that it'll steal pch lanes. so expansion cards will go from 4x to 2x on some motherboards.

    using normal sata you can alraedy max out the controller interface of all the sata ports total. so really the big thing to wait for is pch being upgraded to pci3, which might happen in next revision.

    that said, latency is likely to come down a bit, and normal linux applications don't seem to be very good at pushing enough queue depth at ssd's to extract maximum performance as too many things are done serially. i suppose in theory linux could do prediction and start pushing more requests in. but really it'd be nice if applications had a way to prenotify what they're going to want to request before they request it then the OS deals with it.
    Last edited by mercutio; 05-11-2014 at 10:26 PM.

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    I might hold out a wee bit longer myself until this kind of thing appears on the market;

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M.2

    Mmmmm, promising. I just dont want to wait until next year for a new gaming rig =P I have to because the desktop scene for linux in general is still up in arms and a good saturation of AA and AAA titles is still a good while yet. All my 'Made for Windows' games are old school run on phones stuff almost anyway. Until then, it's trusty ol AMD 955 O/C'd!

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    Quote Originally Posted by stiiixy View Post
    I might hold out a wee bit longer myself until this kind of thing appears on the market;

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M.2

    Mmmmm, promising. I just dont want to wait until next year for a new gaming rig =P I have to because the desktop scene for linux in general is still up in arms and a good saturation of AA and AAA titles is still a good while yet. All my 'Made for Windows' games are old school run on phones stuff almost anyway. Until then, it's trusty ol AMD 955 O/C'd!
    What does M.2 bring in a desktop PC compared to a 2.5" SATA SSD? The price is certainly higher and the performance lower. Last time I heard about it, it was also limited to 512 GB at most (which may be a problem in a few years).
    Last edited by Calinou; 05-12-2014 at 06:12 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calinou View Post
    What does M.2 bring in a desktop PC compared to a 2.5" SATA SSD? The price is certainly higher and the performance lower. Last time I heard about it, it was also limited to 512 GB at most (which may be a problem in a few years).
    NVM, the potential max speed is higher (but is it reached?). [edit]

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    >> [] and Intel Device Protection Technology with Boot Guard for protecting the boot block against malware attacks.
    > Please do your own research before quoting marketing (and possibly dangerous) stuff like that. You do that often enough already.
    Please

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calinou View Post
    Please do your own research before quoting marketing (and possibly dangerous) stuff like that. You do that often enough already.

    So you have unrelased CPUs?
    You might want to look up the definition of "NDA" and what it is used for. Might answer some of your inane questions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calinou View Post
    What does M.2 bring in a desktop PC compared to a 2.5" SATA SSD? The price is certainly higher and the performance lower. Last time I heard about it, it was also limited to 512 GB at most (which may be a problem in a few years).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NVM_Express

    Someone above picked it out, obviously =)

    With the anti-AHCI going's on's, hopefully it wont matter to much if this penetrates real soon real quick and with Intel usually shipping their entreprise boards with stuff like that. Well, here's hoping I can fully utilise my SSD's.

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