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  1. Sadly, yes, but expected is not the same as...

    Sadly, yes, but expected is not the same as admirable.
  2. Tux3 is very different from Btrfs, I don't know...

    Tux3 is very different from Btrfs, I don't know where you got that from. Btrfs uses a "shared tree" design similar to Tux2 from back in 1998 or WAFL from even earlier, with the added wrinkle of...
  3. We appreciate Dave's review, but the tone of it...

    We appreciate Dave's review, but the tone of it falls short of collegial or professional.
  4. It is only fair to point out that Dave Chinner is...

    It is only fair to point out that Dave Chinner is lead developer for the XFS filesystem, not exactly an impartial observer.
  5. Tux3 would be an excellent base for a research...

    Tux3 would be an excellent base for a research project to run straight on raw flash. Not trivial because erase blocks need to be managed. But the pure copy-on-right design and relatively simple...
  6. The story on network transparency is still unsatisfying

    Basically, the story from the Wayland team remains "we already broke network transparency in X so we will just forget about it entirely in Wayland". Sorry, lots of folks are going to keep hating...
  7. Read the mails yourself, and notice the simple...

    Read the mails yourself, and notice the simple fact that all three filesystems ran exactly the same perfectly valid benchmark. I think you owe me an apology.
  8. The reason why Tux3 beats Tmpfs in this...

    The reason why Tux3 beats Tmpfs in this particular benchmark (dbench) is explained in the post. It is because Tux3 is able to offload some of the delete work to a second CPU so that the dbench task...
  9. That's a deep question which has been extensively...

    That's a deep question which has been extensively addressed in various posts. See here:

    http://phunq.net/pipermail/tux3/

    If you are looking for one quick sound bite, hmm, that is hard....
  10. "My recommendation for distros who want udev...

    "My recommendation for distros who want udev without the rest of systemd
    is to build systemd normally and just pick the files you are interested
    in from "make install"" -- Lennart Poettering
    ...
  11. dbus is, by far, the least reliable component on...

    dbus is, by far, the least reliable component on my workstation. Goes into 100% CPU way more times than is comfortable for me. Not the only reliability or performance issue, far from it. The fact...
  12. Sounds like the preponderance of "everyone else"...

    Sounds like the preponderance of "everyone else" is "Red Hat".
  13. It should not be a goal at all. Having the udev...

    It should not be a goal at all. Having the udev maintainer and systemd maintainer be the same person is a recipe for disaster. Untenable situation in my opinion. Obviously, the temptation to leverage...
  14. Yes, the kernel is bloated. Why do you ask?

    Yes, the kernel is bloated. Why do you ask?
  15. Incidentally, Tux3 is a CoW filesystem, but...

    Incidentally, Tux3 is a CoW filesystem, but without the "recursive CoW to root" performance issue.
  16. Let me be very clear about this: nobody but...

    Let me be very clear about this: nobody but developers will be seriously using Tux3 for at least two years. You should regard this as pure developer sport.



    No, Tux3 has not been extensively...
  17. Your experience mirrors many other's, including...

    Your experience mirrors many other's, including mine. This is heartening for us, because it proves that an aggressively optimized filesystem code base can be brought to 100% reliabililty (rounding...
  18. Tux3 implements the equivalent of...

    Tux3 implements the equivalent of "stable_write_page" without a performance hit, in fact we see a huge performance boost, about 40%. We call it "page fork" and it was originally designed more than...
  19. Tux3 implements the equivalent of stable pages at...

    Tux3 implements the equivalent of stable pages at the filesystem level, without the performance drawback. We call it "page fork" and in fact it speeds Tux3 up a lot, as described in the new news post.
  20. Versioning as in snapshotting, like Windows...

    Versioning as in snapshotting, like Windows "previous versions" except way nicer and more efficient, and built into the filesystem instead of the virtual block device. Multiple read/write snapshots...
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