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A New Program Exists To Translate x86 Machine Code Into LLVM Bitcode

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  • A New Program Exists To Translate x86 Machine Code Into LLVM Bitcode

    Phoronix: A New Program Exists To Translate x86 Machine Code Into LLVM Bitcode

    McSema has been officially open-sourced as an advanced program for translating x86 machine code into LLVM bitcode...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc1OTQ

  • #2
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: A New Program Exists To Translate x86 Machine Code Into LLVM Bitcode

    McSema has been officially open-sourced as an advanced program for translating x86 machine code into LLVM bitcode...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc1OTQ
    Let's translate windows

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    • #3
      Originally posted by phoronix View Post
      McSema is the latest program trying to allow taking x86 binaries and turning them back into LLVM bitcode. When the program is back into an LLVM bitcode state, it's theoretically possible to then re-target the code to another architecture [...]
      Great, 64-bit acrobat, finally!

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      • #4
        Re

        I would not say that LLVM Bitecode is easier to read than ASM, it's almost the same when it comes to readability...

        +oleid, Another architecture doesn't mean another platform...
        Most of the big software that is available only on Windows is because it uses Windows API. Something like using threads uses Windows specific calls, something like LLVM bitcode can't help here...

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        • #5
          there is 32bit linux version of acroread :-)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by oleid View Post
            Great, 64-bit acrobat, finally!
            And eventually, steam games (once this tool is ported to Linux)
            I see something cool : you could "recompile" from bytecode for, let's say, ARM, any x86 game, even if you don't have the source.

            Of course, this is not only useful for games, something like flashplayer (32-bits) could also benefit from a such tool. But games are, by far, the widest application I can think of now.

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            • #7
              License

              three-clause BSD license, ugh I hope they relicense it under the more modern two-clause BSD license.

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              • #8
                As long as they don't run into code which reads its own code for integer values or indirect jump pointers; or jumps back into itself at misaligned offsets. Some malware and DRM coding does junk like that.

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