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Oracle Finally Releases Java 8

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  • Oracle Finally Releases Java 8

    Phoronix: Oracle Finally Releases Java 8

    At long last Oracle has officially made available Java 8...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTYzNTI

  • #2
    Oracle doesn't distribute a .deb package for Debian/Ubuntu, but it can be generated with java-package 0.53:

    Code:
    $ apt-get install java-package
    $ make-jpkg jdk-8-linux-x64.tar.gz

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by ebourg View Post
      Oracle doesn't distribute a .deb package for Debian/Ubuntu, but it can be generated with java-package 0.53:

      Code:
      $ apt-get install java-package
      $ make-jpkg jdk-8-linux-x64.tar.gz
      i hate that they dont provide one -.-
      i find myself using webupd8 ppa: http://www.webupd8.org/2012/01/insta...buntu-via.html
      for easy install and update.

      is there a reason why they dont provide a deb file or even better put it on the store?

      Comment


      • #4
        because they love red hat

        Originally posted by TheSoulz View Post
        i hate that they dont provide one -.-
        i find myself using webupd8 ppa: http://www.webupd8.org/2012/01/insta...buntu-via.html
        for easy install and update.

        is there a reason why they dont provide a deb file or even better put it on the store?

        because they love red hat, like intel do with this openclsdk, but a ppa exists, not really a problem

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the props, op!

          I just expand the .tar.gz archive into ~/opt/jdk/jdk1.8.0/. For development, it's best not to use the repo system, hence tools like rbenv in Ruby.

          The only advantage to a repository version of Java is to support other Java apps in the repo.

          Jigsaw supposedly will make application distribution a lot better on Linux in Java 9

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          • #6
            Awesome! Switching as soon as possible.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DanLamb View Post
              I just expand the .tar.gz archive into ~/opt/jdk/jdk1.8.0/. For development, it's best not to use the repo system, hence tools like rbenv in Ruby.
              We do the same... via a somewhat arcane packaging process, our dev machines at work have all the different versions of our techstack parallel-installed under /opt, so there's a directory with about eight different Java versions in it, ranging from 1.4 to 7. I'll have to see if I can clean out any of the old versions when we start looking at 8...

              Comment


              • #8
                the problem of non-transparent icons in the system tray. Does this corrected?
                since I enter the world gnu / linux, this aesthetic problem has always existed.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DanLamb View Post
                  I just expand the .tar.gz archive into ~/opt/jdk/jdk1.8.0/. For development, it's best not to use the repo system, hence tools like rbenv in Ruby.

                  The only advantage to a repository version of Java is to support other Java apps in the repo.
                  Meh, I just use apt to install openjdk[78]. That way I get updates as they're tagged/built, and given that OpenJDK is the official reference platform for Oracle JDK (at least I'm pretty sure I read something to that effect), I figure I'm not missing much.

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                  • #10
                    Is OpenJDK 8 stable and working well?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Veerappan View Post
                      Meh, I just use apt to install openjdk[78]. That way I get updates as they're tagged/built, and given that OpenJDK is the official reference platform for Oracle JDK (at least I'm pretty sure I read something to that effect), I figure I'm not missing much.
                      You get the HotSpot JVM with Oracle's version.

                      Not sure what VM OpenJDK uses. At least, in v6 and v7 it wasn't HotSpot.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It is deeply ironic how you all rush to install Oracle's binary blobs and yet bash open source Mono in different threads. Shame.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Delgarde View Post
                          We do the same... via a somewhat arcane packaging process, our dev machines at work have all the different versions of our techstack parallel-installed under /opt, so there's a directory with about eight different Java versions in it, ranging from 1.4 to 7. I'll have to see if I can clean out any of the old versions when we start looking at 8...
                          Hey folks,

                          If you are to use multiple versions of a package, you can have a look at Lmod, this ease a lot the process of managing multiple versions of a package, properly.

                          Explanation here : https://www.tacc.utexas.edu/tacc-projects/lmod

                          Code here (GPL) : http://sourceforge.net/projects/lmod/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                            You get the HotSpot JVM with Oracle's version.

                            Not sure what VM OpenJDK uses. At least, in v6 and v7 it wasn't HotSpot.
                            You get Hotspot with OpenJDK too (6, 7 or 8)

                            http://openjdk.java.net/groups/hotspot/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RushPL View Post
                              It is deeply ironic how you all rush to install Oracle's binary blobs and yet bash open source Mono in different threads. Shame.
                              For now the JVM is the lesser evil. Scala is a far superior language to either Java or C#. It runs on the JVM. If we can continue to ramp up the adoption of Scala then we can get the resources and person power to build our own Virtual Machine /native compilation, targeted at Linux free of Oracle's control..

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