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A Quick Tour Of Oracle Solaris 11

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  • A Quick Tour Of Oracle Solaris 11

    Phoronix: A Quick Tour Of Oracle Solaris 11

    Solaris 11 was released on Wednesday as the first major update to the former Sun operating system in seven years. A lot has changed in the Solaris stack in the past seven years, and OpenSolaris has come and gone in that time, but in this article is a brief look through the brand new Oracle Solaris 11 release.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=16681

  • #2
    Michael, please, next time use PNG for screenshots.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by birdie View Post
      Michael, please, next time use PNG for screenshots.
      Why? Jpeg looks fine and takes up a lot less space.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cl333r View Post
        Why? Jpeg looks fine and takes up a lot less space.
        Not necessarily true. Especially for system screenshots. Example: http://imgur.com/HAU7i,Yl2M5 (jpg-80: 131 KiB, png: 68 KiB).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cl333r View Post
          Why? Jpeg looks fine and takes up a lot less space.
          optipng -o7 image.png

          Works especially well with a limited color palette like in screenshots.

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          • #6
            wondered why they didnt move to gnome-shell

            maybe next version unless they going to support matte

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cl333r View Post
              Why? Jpeg looks fine and takes up a lot less space.
              Just keep silent, this way you won't look stupendously stupid.

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              • #8
                roll back files to a later date
                Solaris 11 even knows what your files will look like tomorrow. Not that's what I call AI!

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                • #9
                  Facebook know everything youv ever done. Oracle know everything you ever will do. If they merge, it will be the end of the world as we know it

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                  • #10
                    i still want to know what exactly makes solaris a cloud os, what makes it so much better for virtualization, and what it has to offer over linux or free-bsd at this point.


                    as for everyone fighting over jpg and png - jpg DOES look fine depending on how compressed it is, and jpg is ideal for websites because it is a bit faster than png and it gets the image out there and thats all we need. i don't think the little bit of lossy quality is a big deal when we're looking at an OS screenshot for only a few seconds. personally i don't really care, png is fine with me. but wow some of you are hostile to an unnecessary level.

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                    • #11
                      Everything in Solaris is virtualized. The network stack, cpu, everything. For instance, If you use Containers on Linux is the network stack virtualized? Is everything on Linux virtualized? Or only the Containers?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kebabbert View Post
                        Everything in Solaris is virtualized. The network stack, cpu, everything. For instance, If you use Containers on Linux is the network stack virtualized? Is everything on Linux virtualized? Or only the Containers?
                        so what exactly is the point? what does that offer that the real stuff can't? this is not a rhetorical question i'm legitimately wondering

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                          so what exactly is the point? what does that offer that the real stuff can't? this is not a rhetorical question i'm legitimately wondering
                          http://hub.opensolaris.org/bin/view/...ionsolutions3F

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                            i still want to know what exactly makes solaris a cloud os, what makes it so much better for virtualization, and what it has to offer over linux or free-bsd at this point.
                            It has enterprise features... The problem with virtualization on every OS besides the new Solaris is that you need to run an entire OS for each virtualization.. The new Solaris supposedly lets you set up virtualized "zones" so you get all the benefits of virtualization without any of the drawbacks of losing all the hard drive space to multiple operating systems or getting hit with the redundant OS overhead of running multiple OSs, or having to worry about security updates for multiple OSs, on every server, etc. etc... It's sort of like Virtualization meets Chroot.. Then consider that you can easily take these "zones" and automatically duplicate them over to other hardware to add in redundancy.. Now imagine tens of thousands of servers where every server has their "zones" synchronized onto at least a few other servers which might not even be in the same country, let alone the same room... Where you can just walk around and power off random servers or even an entire data center and it won't matter and the customers won't even notice because of all the "enterprise class" redundancy... This is a "cloud" solution.. A whole ton of money poured into massively redundant self-managing server infrastructure and Oracle wants to be in on it...

                            Oracle doesn't screw around... They don't go after Amazon, Google, or Akamai, instead they go after the corporations and web companies that Google, Amazon and Akamai get there revenue from. Oracle tries to get those corps hooked on Oracle server support contracts which will cost those corps big money over very long periods of time.. Of course, Oracle doesn't present it that way, rather they present it as a solution that requires little to no staff and so it "saves money", but then if something does go wrong, needless to say, Oracle is always ready to send a whole bandwagon of "specialists" to your doorstep, each of which cost you $300/hr..

                            You'd be surprised how many corporate execs would rush to implement things like self-managing cloud hardware if they think it can cut down on their IT costs long term.. But they don't see the hidden Oracle consultation costs that always crop up when the company tries to grow or relocate. I've never seen a single company ever work with Oracle and NOT shot themselves in the foot in some way or another.

                            I don't have a problem with Solaris.. Never had... But Oracle.. Not good.. Even if they wave the Solaris banner... Not good...
                            Last edited by Sidicas; 11-10-2011, 10:35 PM.

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                            • #15
                              wow sidicas thanks for the info i never knew that the new solaris was this interesting. although i would find it very hard to find a practical use for it's ability in everyday purposes, i can see it's potential and it is now it FINALLY stands out.

                              what i really like about what you told me is now i feel solaris is it's own category, and i really like that because i'm tired of seeing "yet another desktop (or server) OS". i hope to see future development and improvements.

                              i don't really have much of a problem with oracle. they tend to have a very MS personality to them (meaning, if they can't figure out how to join the competition, they buy it out) but at least they're not big enough to slack off or abuse their power.

                              i'm still waiting for gpu passthrough for virtualbox and then i'm content.

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