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Oracle Solaris 11 Is Finally Released

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  • Oracle Solaris 11 Is Finally Released

    Phoronix: Oracle Solaris 11 Is Finally Released

    It's been seven years since the release of Solaris 10, and about one year later than originally slated, but Oracle officially released Solaris 11 today...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTAxMzQ

  • #2
    Slowlaris the first "Cloud OS"? In what world are they living? Oh, I know:

    "first fully virtualized operating system."
    This just proves they're living in some virtual world.

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    • #3
      Can someone explain to me "the first fully virtualized operating system." ?

      Thanks

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bulletxt View Post
        Can someone explain to me "the first fully virtualized operating system." ?

        Thanks
        It probably runs in java virtual machine.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bulletxt View Post
          Can someone explain to me "the first fully virtualized operating system." ?

          Thanks
          I'm probably going to get this wrong, but I'll take a stab at it...
          In a modern server, it's quite common to separate the web server from the database server even if they run on the same hardware.. That way if your web server gets hacked and the hacker gets root access, the hackers won't have access to your database and vice-versa even if it runs on the same hardware... The way to do it currently is to run multiple operating systems at the same time inside of their own virtual machines. Then under the host OS, you don't run any services and lock it down very tight to be sure it doesn't get compromised.. If one of the virtual machines gets compromised, as least it isolates the compromise from the rest of the server.. Also it's a lot easier to move your database server over to other hardware if you need to.. You just copy the image over to the new hardware and start it up..


          The problem with doing the above is that you need to run multiple instances of the OS (host OS + OS instance for each virtualization) and it can really chew through a lot of server resources, especially in OS overhead.

          A fully virtualized OS can provide complete isolations (similar to chroot) and can ensure the fair access to hardware across virtualizations so that one hacked virtualization can't establish a monopoly on all the CPU cycles, network bandwidth or disk I/O no matter how many processes it spawns... And it also does it all without providing any direct hardware access to any of the virtualizations which is important for security and fairness reasons.

          So in short.. It's basically virtual machines taken to their next logical step where you can reap the benefits of less overhead and better fairness in the access to the hardware. I don't think it helps with security over traditional virtual machines, but I'm not 100% sure there.. Certainly it's a ton more secure than running your database and web server as processes under the same OS instance..

          No doubt, Oracle is going to be targeting all users of VirtualBox as potential customers for their new Solaris OS as they would likely have something to gain by switching to it.
          Last edited by Sidicas; 11-09-2011, 05:29 PM.

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          • #6
            Virtualised Operating Systems

            Wouldn't IBM's VM series (e.g. VM/370, z/VM, etc.) include the first 'fully virtualised operating system'? Please correct me if I'm mistaken.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sduic View Post
              Wouldn't IBM's VM series (e.g. VM/370, z/VM, etc.) include the first 'fully virtualised operating system'? Please correct me if I'm mistaken.
              IBM Mainframes does not have Containers (Zones) as described above by Sidicas. Mainframes run a complete kernel. In Containers, only one kernel is active, and the rest of the kernels act as a thin layer. Only one kernel active. In contrast to VMware, lots of complete kernels run using lots of resources. Another thing is that everything is virtualized in Solaris, NIC, cpu, etc.

              If you look at some of the world record benchmarks that Solaris has today, it uses several servers via Containers on a single server.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bulletxt View Post
                Can someone explain to me "the first fully virtualized operating system."
                It's the usual. Marketing. Means nothing.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sbergman27 View Post
                  It's the usual. Marketing. Means nothing.
                  Actually, it is not the usual. It is something. Read here for a better explanation, if you want to know why it is interesting, and read the post after that:
                  http://phoronix.com/forums/showthrea...977#post237977

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kebabbert View Post
                    Actually, it is not the usual. It is something. Read here for a better explanation, if you want to know why it is interesting, and read the post after that
                    Wow. Solaris has Zones. It's had zones for years. And so have most of the other *nix-like OSes. Looks like maybe they've added some sales brochure bullet points. Like I say. Marketing. Means nothing. Are you saying that you are really excited about it?

                    One might have hoped for more from 7 years of work.
                    Last edited by sbergman27; 11-11-2011, 10:13 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sbergman27 View Post
                      Wow. Solaris has Zones. It's had zones for years. And so have most of the other *nix-like OSes. Looks like maybe they've added some sales brochure bullet points. Like I say. Marketing. Means nothing. Are you saying that you are really excited about it?

                      One might have hoped for more from 7 years of work.
                      Again, its not about Zones. It is the combination of everything else, like Crossbow (virtualized network stack) etc.

                      ZFS allows you to do a snapshot before an upgrade. If the upgrade breaks something, you can just reboot into GRUB and choose which snapshot you want to boot into. So you choose to boot into an earlier, functioning snapshot, and then destroy the latest broken snapshot. This takes a few seconds. This is another killer feature that Solaris has; it is the combination of ZFS + Snapshot + GRUB that gives this unique power called Boot Environments. If you think that "ZFS allows you to do snapshots, wow" - you have missed the point of BEs. If you upgrade your Linux installation and break it, what do you do? Reinstall everything? How much downtime? With BE + ZFS you have only a minute of downtime.

                      Again, it is the combinations of different techniques that give the power. It is said that Unix is simple, but there are pipes, etc that allow you to combine different single commands giving you the power of Unix. Each command in itself might be nothing special, but the combo gives you real power. If you dont understand why, then it is your loss. Same with Solaris. Containers in itself is not that powerful, it is the combinations of Containers + ZFS + Crossbow and other combos.

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