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  • Native ZFS Is Coming To Linux Next Month

    Phoronix: Native ZFS Is Coming To Linux Next Month

    Prior to the emergence of Btrfs as a viable next-generation Linux file-system, Sun's ZFS file-system was sought after for Linux due to its advanced feature-set and capabilities compared to EXT3 and other open-source file-systems at the time. While ZFS support has worked its way into OpenSolaris, FreeBSD, NetBSD, and other operating systems, ZFS had not been ported to Linux as its source-code is distributed under the CDDL license, which is incompatible with the GNU GPL barring it from integration into the mainline Linux kernel. Next month, however, a working ZFS module for the Linux kernel without a dependence on FUSE will be publicly released.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=15232

  • #2
    I'd be interested in seeing comparison between ext4/LVM-RAID5 with ZFS/RAIDZ. ZFS is not meant to be used on single disk as most of its features are only useful in multiple-disks setup.

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    • #3
      Is this for Linux? Or only for Fedora and Ubuntu? The article's title says "Linux", but the article itself says building from source is for Ubuntu?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RealNC View Post
        Is this for Linux? Or only for Fedora and Ubuntu? The article's title says "Linux", but the article itself says building from source is for Ubuntu?
        Did you read the article? If there is source code that compiles against the Linux kernel (Ubuntu case), then it's for Linux.

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        • #5
          I did read the article. That's why I asked; the article says:

          "there will be RPMs for Fedora 12 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Beta 2. Installing ZFS on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS will be supported, but you will need to build the kernel module from source"

          I don't know about you, but to me this looks like only Red Hat, Fedora and Ubuntu are supported.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RealNC View Post
            I did read the article. That's why I asked; the article says:

            "there will be RPMs for Fedora 12 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Beta 2. Installing ZFS on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS will be supported, but you will need to build the kernel module from source"

            I don't know about you, but to me this looks like only Red Hat, Fedora and Ubuntu are supported.
            Well, supported is irrelevent, isn't it? It's free

            So the source code is there, build it, and use ZFS in $_dist_of_choice like in the distros you mentioned.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by fackamato View Post
              Well, supported is irrelevent, isn't it? It's free

              So the source code is there, build it, and use ZFS in $_dist_of_choice like in the distros you mentioned.
              My question resolves around whether this is possible at all.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                My question resolves around whether this is possible at all.
                I don't see why not? If you have the source code, and you know it's supported for Ubuntu 10.04, then why shouldn't it work with your own kernel as long as it's not too far from Ubuntu's version number?

                Just saying.

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                • #9
                  If they're targeting Red Hat and Ubuntu, then this implies that they use non-kernel stuff. Otherwise, they would simply target the upstream kernel and be distro-agnostic, which is the easiest approach.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                    If they're targeting Red Hat and Ubuntu, then this implies that they use non-kernel stuff. Otherwise, they would simply target the upstream kernel and be distro-agnostic, which is the easiest approach.
                    So you think there's some non-kernel stuff in Fedora 12, RHEL 6 beta 2, and Ubuntu 10.04 that somehow can't be made to work on any other distros?

                    Sounds like they're just targeting easy package management integration into those specific distros, and the code itself probably does target the upstream kernel.

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                    • #11
                      It looks Oracle missed the chance to show they 'love' Linux even more then they're claiming. The good thing they can do is to release ZFS under GPL, but now, this will be just about business and not about love.

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                      • #12
                        Too much negative criticizing in the articles Michael Larabel.

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                        • #13
                          I don't like these people who are making these claims. Aside from the fact that they are rude and arrogant, their claims have no real substance. Their licensing is incompatible. They may produce rpms of it, but not only can it never be included in mainline kernel, it can't even be included with a legit distribution, which means it will NEVER be a simple matter of "yum install zfs".

                          In addition, they make some SERIOUS claims against the viability of a fuse-based filesystem that are, quite frankly, FALSE. Yes, the zfs-fuse filesystem can be slow... on OLD KERNELS. The limitations that these problems are created by have been solved. zfs-fuse, when correctly configured, gives near-platter performance levels!

                          And going through fuse solves the majority of the licensing issues. Its a win-win! And so you have this person coming on the forum here, making crazy claims, not providing any substance, and expect everyone to be amazed? All they're doing is trying to build up hype... for something that is going to tank. Big time.

                          Not to mention the fact that BTRFS does virtually everything ZFS claims, but is GPL -- meaning that it IS in kernel, it IS supported, you CAN install your root filesystem to there. So what's the point of ZFS to begin with?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                            Not to mention the fact that BTRFS does virtually everything ZFS claims, but is GPL -- meaning that it IS in kernel, it IS supported, you CAN install your root filesystem to there. So what's the point of ZFS to begin with?
                            ZFS is stable and production systems ready. btrfs is very far from that.

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                            • #15
                              Why all the work to install ZFS on linux when you can have the best of both worlds with http://www.nexenta.org

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