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The OpenSolaris Board Just Killed Itself, As Expected

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  • The OpenSolaris Board Just Killed Itself, As Expected

    Phoronix: The OpenSolaris Board Just Killed Itself, As Expected

    Last month we reported that the OpenSolaris Governing Board may kill itself if Oracle would not appoint a liaison to the OpenSolaris community to interact with and communicate their future plans. After that OGB death threat was announced, the Illumos project was announced, which is basically a fork of OpenSolaris. Less than two weeks ago, however, Oracle finally announced it would be killing off OpenSolaris and making other changes to how Oracle Solaris is developed and delivered. With that said, the OpenSolaris Governing Board approved the decision this morning to end itself and return control of the OpenSolaris community to Oracle...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODU0MA

  • #2
    Still have Linux

    OpenSolaris was always a useless distraction for desktop users. All desktop development efforts should be focused on Linux, which has the momentum and a strong copy-left license to ensure that improvements remain open and benefit all end-users.

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    • #3
      Desktop development can pretty much be platform agnostic, given there are mature cross platform libraries for it, like Qt for example. So it has nothing to do with specifically Linux or OpenSolaris.

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      • #4
        tell me as a Linux user who understands how Solaris just doesn't work how to do any of the following:

        the command: "ifconfig bge0 addif 192.168.34.7 netmask 255.255.255.0 up"
        to add a virtual interface attached to bge0 with the address and netmask specified.

        the command: "snoop -d bge0 not port 22"
        to watch all network traffic on bge0 that isn't via the ssh connection I'm connected in via

        the command: "zpool import jadpool"
        to import a zfs pool on a USB device and mount all the relevant points over the file system in the same points they were last mounted.

        I like Linux. My kids and wife use it at home on a dual boot system that hasn't actually run windows since 2009. I work in an office full of Linux Laptops because it works quicker and uses less resources on a laptop that OpenSolaris ... but my work laptop runs OpenSolaris and every so often I get asked to do stuff, especially networking, because I can and it's so much easier.

        Linux is very good but it's not necessarily better.

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        • #5
          It is better because it's license guarantees that it will stay FREE for ever.

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          • #6
            As strange as it may seem the CDDL means that the code of OpenSolaris will remain open and free forever ...

            the GPL isn't the only license that allows that.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jadrevenge View Post
              As strange as it may seem the CDDL means that the code of OpenSolaris will remain open and free forever ...

              the GPL isn't the only license that allows that.
              Actually it seems more like GPL isn't about making free code but making a community of free code that is insanely hard to kill. This is the catch about GPL. Community comes first, everything else comes next.

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              • #8
                Edit delay; and the means of accomplishing they took to that is of a viral lisence and accumulating intellectual property to the community, slowly but surely. Every inventive GPL program makes the GPL community a bit more powerful.

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                • #9
                  Kudoz to nanonyme

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                  • #10
                    Agreed, I've never seen the GNU GPL from this angle.
                    Now I have a good answer when someone tells me I care too much about the code, just because I want to chose a good license.

                    Thank you

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                    • #11
                      Note that I attempted to remain as objective as possible. The former doesn't mean you should use GPL, it's just important to keep in mind when deciding whether or not you want to use it.
                      There's some ethical aspects involved there too since it's not algother hard to recognize similar strategies in patent pools by MPEG LA and such and GPL licensed software for GPL community.
                      The thing is whether one believes the cause is important enough to justify the cause when it comes to ideology. Is it okay to gather big enough an arsenal of IP that GPL community can force other people to join in the GPL community if it furthens the cause of opensource code? What if it's another opensource project that's just using GPL-incompatible license?
                      Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster
                      Friedrich Nietzsche

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                      • #12
                        How the fuck would the GPL have made a difference? Practically all code in OpenSolaris belongs to Oracle. If they chose not to release any source code, they'll simply do so. GPL or CDDL. And if anyone tried funny suing business, they'd just change the license and make you fuck off.

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                        • #13
                          As long as they had chosen GPL then the code wouldn't belong to Oracle anymore but to the community.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Apopas View Post
                            As long as they had chosen GPL then the code wouldn't belong to Oracle anymore but to the community.
                            Myeah, true. Oracle wouldn't have been allowed to make derivative work on their own GPL code unless they also published that under GPL.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
                              Myeah, true. Oracle wouldn't have been allowed to make derivative work on their own GPL code unless they also published that under GPL.
                              Huh? You can make a derivative work of your own code and distribute that under whatever license you desire, regardless of any previous license you used in the past to distribute your code.

                              The keyword here is own code (i.e. code of which you are the copyright holder). In case of GPL'd code, you just have to make sure that you require contributers to assign the copyright to you or have some other clause in a contributer agreement that gives you the right to relicense their contributed code. Not exactly something new to Sun.

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