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Netbook Performance: Ubuntu vs. OpenSolaris

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  • Originally posted by Apopas View Post
    As far as I understand, Macosx users don't differ that much than windows ones. Marketing is the Apple's great weapon all these years just like Microsoft and not price, freedom and performance just like Linux.
    Psst, out of those three price is a badly defined concept (OEM prices) and freedom is uninteresting to most people (who are ready to give up even their civil rights to their governments to be more safe). So the only useful number is performance and to convince people your system is faster, you need to tell them that it is. Hence marketing.
    If you want a system majority wants to use, it has to be fast, secure and easy to use all at once, and people need to hear and believe it. (well, just having people believe it is enough but always better that it actually is so it's less trivial for competitors to convince them otherwise) It's not nearly all about software engineering but also having people realize you and your product exist.
    Last edited by nanonyme; 09-25-2009, 08:00 AM.

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    • Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
      Psst, out of those three price is a badly defined concept (OEM prices) and freedom is uninteresting to most people (who are ready to give up even their civil rights to their governments to be more safe). So the only useful number is performance and to convince people your system is faster, you need to tell them that it is. Hence marketing.
      Yup, that's exactly my point. That's why Linux users (and the other FOSS of course) differ so much than the proprietary ones.
      Linuxers and Macers has nothing in common. Windowsers and Macers share a lot.

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      • Originally posted by kraftman View Post
        Tannenbaum didn't say Linux scales bad, so what are you talking about? I said don't fool yourself talking about Tannenbaum. I consider he's an asshole and maybe even an idiot. Very close minded one.
        I'd be cautious calling him either, kraftman. He's probably forgotten more about computers, computer science, and the like, than most of have learned over the years. Andy's one of the truly sharp ones out there. Now, if you were to say he was opinionated and sometimes wrong like all humans can be (even Linus is that... )- I'd concur heartily.

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        • Originally posted by Svartalf View Post
          I'd be cautious calling him either, kraftman. He's probably forgotten more about computers, computer science, and the like, than most of have learned over the years. Andy's one of the truly sharp ones out there. Now, if you were to say he was opinionated and sometimes wrong like all humans can be (even Linus is that... )- I'd concur heartily.
          Yeah, I'm sometimes not fair :/ It makes me sick when someone tries to force some idea etc. but I shouldn't be calling him. Btw. I don't consider Linus being some kind of super human etc. Nobody is, in my opinion :>

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          • Originally posted by frantaylor View Post
            Here is a typical Linux FAIL scenario:

            Customer has hard limit for transaction completion, say 5 seconds with 10000 users. Linux may complete 99.9% of transactions in 1.5 seconds, but 0.01% come back in 6 seconds, FAILING the test.

            On same hardware, Solaris completes 100% of transactions within 5 seconds and PASSES the test. Even if the average response time is twice Linux, Solaris WINS and Linux LOSES.

            Just to clarify things. The above describes a deadline problem. Guaranteeing deadlines is something that only real-time operating systems do.
            As far as I know neither Solaris nor Linux is a real-time operating system, thus saying that any of those systems would complete some transaction within a certain deadline in 100% of cases is by definition untrue. Unless a system is designed to always meet deadlines (thus being a real-time system), it will not always meet deadlines.

            If a customer REALLY has a HARD limit for transaction completion, such as in case of a laser cutter controller or a life-support system, the customer should choose a HARD real-time operating system. Not Solaris, not Linux (at least not the normal one, RTLinux is a commercially suported hard real-time microkernel that wraps around Linux and possibly could do the job).

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            • bump~

              Just to clarify things: Solaris is not a real-time OS but Sun did have a real-time OS a decade ago. It was called ChorusOS.

              Solaris does have real-time scheduling classes, that approach what most people think they need in a RT OS. And it's the same kernel and distribution as regular production/GA Solaris.

              The truth is, the demand for a real-time OS is so low, and the number of serious users so tiny, that Chorus died of loneliness. As an act of mercy, Sun released Chorus as opensource:

              http://www.experimentalstuff.com/Tec...sOS/index.html

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