Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

CyberLink Announces Linux HD Video Player

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • CyberLink Announces Linux HD Video Player

    Phoronix: CyberLink Announces Linux HD Video Player

    CyberLink's proprietary PowerDVD player has been available on Linux for sometime -- and can even be purchased through the Ubuntu store -- but today they have kicked their Linux support up by a notch or two. They have announced this morning that PowerDVD Linux and PowerCinema are now available for Linux-powered netbooks (such as the ASUS Eee PC 901) and nettops...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=Njc3Mw

  • #2
    This news is quite confusing... It certainly can't mean that by using this software you will be able to watch a HD movie on a netbook, simply because that's impossible (not only it doesn't make sense to watch a 1920x1080 movie on a 1024x600 screen, but an atom 1.6 Ghz processor and an Intel GMA 950 IGP simply don't have the power to do it), but even if it was intended for a powerful desktop with a HD display, you still need driver support to enable any kind of acceleration (and that driver support is not available in Linux yet).

    So does it mean that *if* you have a fast enough processor and a big enough display (on your *desktop*), you will be able to watch a BD movie *without* hardware acceleration by using this software? Hhmm... can't you do that already with good ol' MPlayer? Or did I miss something?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Luis View Post
      This news is quite confusing... It certainly can't mean that by using this software you will be able to watch a HD movie on a netbook, simply because that's impossible (not only it doesn't make sense to watch a 1920x1080 movie on a 1024x600 screen, but an atom 1.6 Ghz processor and an Intel GMA 950 IGP simply don't have the power to do it), but even if it was intended for a powerful desktop with a HD display, you still need driver support to enable any kind of acceleration (and that driver support is not available in Linux yet).

      So does it mean that *if* you have a fast enough processor and a big enough display (on your *desktop*), you will be able to watch a BD movie *without* hardware acceleration by using this software? Hhmm... can't you do that already with good ol' MPlayer? Or did I miss something?
      Yes, your right this "HD for netbooks" doesn't make a whole lot of sense on many levels.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll be excited when their proprietary software can play blu ray discs. The draw of "being legit" isn't nearly as much as the draw of functionality I can't get otherwise.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by etymxris View Post
          I'll be excited when their proprietary software can play blu ray discs.
          That's what I was just about to ask about.

          I would love to convert my HTPC to Linux... I just need HD-PVR drivers and Blu-Ray support. Normally I'm not a big fan of proprietary binary crap software, but, big surprise, I'm willing to compromise to at least get rid of Vista (gah).

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah, I didn't see anything about Blu-Ray in that press release; it almost sounds like they're confusing HD with HD-five-years-ago.

            If you say HD, I assume you mean 1920x1080. Is this a legit blu-ray player for linux or is it not?

            Comment


            • #7
              I'll be excited about this software when they bundle it with any discrete DVD/BD driver you can buy now off the shelf, which comes bundled with their software (for Windows). It's been ages since I last bought an OEM computer, all my systems I've built, and I am not going to go back to OEM just yet. At any rate, there is no way the general public can get a hold of this software other than through a "hardware" purchase (be it a drive, or a computer)

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree - very confusing press release.

                Where exactly is the HD they refer to?

                We already have plenty of DVD players.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes, but we don't have plenty of DVD players that will legally play css encoded DVDs in the U.S (and Germany? I forget).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    that still doesn't turn dvd material in hd material, sounds like another marketing crew with no clue about their company and it's products

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It would be interesting to see the feature list for it side by side to their list here http://www.cyberlink.com/multi/products/main_1_ENU.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        wait, why do I want DVD player software on my netbook? You know, the little device that doesn't have a DVD drive.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          IF their HD support mean support of AVCHD then it can be usefull for all of the people who bought a sony HD camcorder.
                          I do not think that gstreamer or vlc support it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Not too long ago we considered standard DVD resolution as an HD format... Is amazing how the concept seems so... flexible.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Thetargos View Post
                              Not too long ago we considered standard DVD resolution as an HD format... Is amazing how the concept seems so... flexible.
                              welcome in the flexibel world of ict naming conventions, where every dictonary is out-of-date in a few weeks flat

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X