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Coreboot Now Works On The Older MacBook 1,1 Too

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  • Coreboot Now Works On The Older MacBook 1,1 Too

    Phoronix: Coreboot Now Works On The Older MacBook 1,1 Too

    As an update to yesterday's story about Coreboot now working for the MacBook 2,1 model, with today's Git activity the open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement will also work with the even older 1,1 model...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc2NjE

  • #2
    Thanks God.

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    • #3
      Coreboot project is more important than people think. Secure Boot proved that UEFI was a dead end for x86-based open-source systems and of course on ARM-based platforms things are even worse. As long as firmware is proprietary you never fully control the hardware you buy. Many custom hacks exist (especially for ARM) but they're just hacks - usually buggy or incomplete and almost always unmaintained in the long run in contrast with Coreboot which is as generic as BIOS replacement can get.

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      • #4
        So that means that it's finally possible to have ahci support on macbooks?
        Because the mac uefi registered the ahci as a piix4 device and not an ahci.

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        • #5
          Time may come when only coreboot or enthusiest boards can run Linux.

          Originally posted by prodigy_ View Post
          Coreboot project is more important than people think. Secure Boot proved that UEFI was a dead end for x86-based open-source systems and of course on ARM-based platforms things are even worse. As long as firmware is proprietary you never fully control the hardware you buy. Many custom hacks exist (especially for ARM) but they're just hacks - usually buggy or incomplete and almost always unmaintained in the long run in contrast with Coreboot which is as generic as BIOS replacement can get.
          I'm guessing the time is coming when factory firmware is locked to the current version of Windows and only aftermarket boards with fancy overclocking UEFI will retain the ability to run an alternative operating system, and that because they are sold without the rest of the machine or the OS. To run Linux on a machine sold with Windows or anything else will probably require either installing Coreboot, replacing the board, or finding an overclocking UEFI image for a board with the exact same chipset, whichever is easier for any particular machine.

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          • #6
            Honestly, the instant that CoreBoot announces full support for my Acer Aspire 6930 (a Core2Duo CPU with GMA45 graphics), I'm going to flash it. My current BIOS is so crap, it's not even funny.

            I really hope CoreBoot gets more support in the future from many different devs/companies.
            Quick Question though: Does CoreBoot implement BIOS, UEFI, both, or it's own thing?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
              Honestly, the instant that CoreBoot announces full support for my Acer Aspire 6930 (a Core2Duo CPU with GMA45 graphics), I'm going to flash it. My current BIOS is so crap, it's not even funny.

              I really hope CoreBoot gets more support in the future from many different devs/companies.
              Quick Question though: Does CoreBoot implement BIOS, UEFI, both, or it's own thing?
              No, Coreboot does not implement BIOS, UEFI, or it's own alternative.

              All coreboot aims to do it to get the hardware initialized and had off to something else. That something else might by a BIOS (seaBIOS) or UEFI (tianocore) implementation, or other thing (Grub or a linux kernel)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by WorBlux View Post
                No, Coreboot does not implement BIOS, UEFI, or it's own alternative.

                All coreboot aims to do it to get the hardware initialized and had off to something else. That something else might by a BIOS (seaBIOS) or UEFI (tianocore) implementation, or other thing (Grub or a linux kernel)
                So... what exactly is the point of a BIOS or UEFI, aside from a graphical way to configure your hardware? Or is that literally the only point...? I thought the BIOS/UEFI was the standards-based implementations of hardware initialization :/
                (A direct handoff to GRUB would make my computer boot about 8 seconds faster)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
                  So... what exactly is the point of a BIOS or UEFI, aside from a graphical way to configure your hardware? Or is that literally the only point...? I thought the BIOS/UEFI was the standards-based implementations of hardware initialization :/
                  (A direct handoff to GRUB would make my computer boot about 8 seconds faster)
                  It's pretty much only overclocking and boot device selection nowadays. Neither coreboot nor linux have OC code, and no payload can boot from cd/floppy yet. I believe the payloads do support USB and PXE chainloading.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by curaga View Post
                    It's pretty much only overclocking and boot device selection nowadays. Neither coreboot nor linux have OC code, and no payload can boot from cd/floppy yet. I believe the payloads do support USB and PXE chainloading.
                    I disagree Linux can overclock by probing and changing MSR's. It's not necessarily easy but it's a UI rather than driver limitation.

                    SeaBIOS can boot from optical ATAPI optical drives

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