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Google "Slippy" Chromebook Supported By Coreboot

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  • Google "Slippy" Chromebook Supported By Coreboot

    Phoronix: Google "Slippy" Chromebook Supported By Coreboot

    As of Saturday night the "Slippy" is the latest Google Chromebook to be supported by the open-source Coreboot firmware. As with supporting other Chromebooks, adding support for the codenamed Haswell mobile device added a great deal of new code...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTUyNDU

  • #2
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: Google "Slippy" Chromebook Supported By Coreboot

    As of Saturday night the "Slippy" is the latest Google Chromebook to be supported by the open-source Coreboot firmware. As with supporting other Chromebooks, adding support for the codenamed Haswell mobile device added a great deal of new code...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTUyNDU
    Hopefully they will release a laptop that fixes the shortcomings of the pixel (storage, other oss booting etc.)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
      Hopefully they will release a laptop that fixes the shortcomings of the pixel (storage, other oss booting etc.)
      Yeah I would really like to get a Chromebook that I could use to install Linux on thus avoiding paying for Windows but they continue to try to force people to use Google drive by limiting the storage space. Such a shame.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
        Hopefully they will release a laptop that fixes the shortcomings of the pixel (storage, other oss booting etc.)
        Of course they won't do that. They want you to use chromeOS and other google services, so that you'll generate more data and revenue for them.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
          Hopefully they will release a laptop that fixes the shortcomings of the pixel (storage, other oss booting etc.)
          Do you mean that it’s not possible to install another OS on a ChromeBook?

          I too was thinking a ChromeBook could be a nice machine with a bigger HDD (or SDD) and Linux…

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by stqn View Post
            Do you mean that it’s not possible to install another OS on a ChromeBook?

            I too was thinking a ChromeBook could be a nice machine with a bigger HDD (or SDD) and Linux…
            No. It is possible to get it to run linux. I just want them to get rid of the dev mode stuff, waiting 30 seconds to boot and that shit.

            Apart from that 128/256GB SSD and 16GB or RAM would have mabe it the perfect laptop.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
              No. It is possible to get it to run linux. I just want them to get rid of the dev mode stuff, waiting 30 seconds to boot and that shit.
              Ok, I found this page which explains it: http://www.howtogeek.com/162120/how-...-with-crouton/
              It makes sense but it’s also a very good reason not to buy ChromeBooks…

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              • #8
                The whining here is just amazing...

                Well, Dev-Mode is ChromeOS Dev-Mode - if you want more than that (and avoid the 30 seconds wait time in particular), you'll have to open the box and tweak a screw (which serves as a jumper). Once.
                Those 30 seconds (with scary splash screen) are part of the security model, the idea being that to open the box you'll need long enough, doing suspicious activity that you can't take over any ChromeOS device that's unsupervised for 5 minutes, while Dev Mode is the easy way for "light" modifications.

                There are plenty of boards that don't allow you to override the flashing procedure at all, except by directly attaching to the chip with expensive equipment. Google makes it feasible with their boxes, documents it (eg. Acer C720: http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/...720-chromebook see "write-protect screw") and you choose to - whine? Absolutely amazing.

                http://johnlewis.ie/pre-built-corebo...r-chromebooks/ describes the process in great detail. It's possible to get rid of the 5 seconds delay he encountered, but I don't have his models around to fix things - but that's not "evil Google", it's a bug.
                With some more effort, you can even get Windows to run natively on those boxes (I did).

                tl;dr: On a chromebook there's regular ChromeOS mode, Dev Mode and tinkerer mode (opening the box required once). Somehow people forget about the last one.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would love to buy a chromebook/box providing it was decently powered with at least easily interchangeable storage. But sadly the whole focus of the Chrome OS is for those who need simply to browse the web and little else. Valve and the different steam machines should be decently powered and allow other operating systems to be installed. So they look a little more appealing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pgeorgi View Post
                    Well, Dev-Mode is ChromeOS Dev-Mode - if you want more than that (and avoid the 30 seconds wait time in particular), you'll have to open the box and tweak a screw (which serves as a jumper). Once.
                    Those 30 seconds (with scary splash screen) are part of the security model, the idea being that to open the box you'll need long enough, doing suspicious activity that you can't take over any ChromeOS device that's unsupervised for 5 minutes, while Dev Mode is the easy way for "light" modifications.

                    There are plenty of boards that don't allow you to override the flashing procedure at all, except by directly attaching to the chip with expensive equipment. Google makes it feasible with their boxes, documents it (eg. Acer C720: http://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/...720-chromebook see "write-protect screw") and you choose to - whine? Absolutely amazing.

                    http://johnlewis.ie/pre-built-corebo...r-chromebooks/ describes the process in great detail. It's possible to get rid of the 5 seconds delay he encountered, but I don't have his models around to fix things - but that's not "evil Google", it's a bug.
                    With some more effort, you can even get Windows to run natively on those boxes (I did).

                    tl;dr: On a chromebook there's regular ChromeOS mode, Dev Mode and tinkerer mode (opening the box required once). Somehow people forget about the last one.
                    Does the pixel have a write protect screw??

                    Comment

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