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Canonical Lowers Ubuntu Edge Pricing

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  • #21
    Originally posted by akincer View Post
    You should probably read that page. You'll find interesting things like this:

    "The hardware requirements are straightforward and, with a broad range of ARM and x86 hardware supported, it can realistically be added to phones already in development."

    Aren't facts fun?
    eww X86 not X86_64
    Edit whats the point of 4GB min of Ram? PAE sucks
    Last edited by LinuxGamer; 07-24-2013, 11:41 AM.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by DanLamb View Post
      What is the advantage of running Ubuntu on a smartphone? I'm not trolling, just asking. Android seems way ahead of Ubuntu in terms of GUI functionality, while desktop Linux like Ubuntu seems way ahead in terms of the full command line ecosystem.

      Also, why doesn't Ubuntu push Java more for GUI app development? It seems that many of the best GUI apps, such as the super IDEs like IntelliJ and Eclipse, and even a few games (Minecraft, Wakfu) are Java-based? That seems like an ideal solution to the problems of desktop Linux GUI development.
      The advantage is that you can have full device convergence. That's just marketing speak for "one device to be your desktop AND phone". So far, efforts to do this have been quite clumsy at best and total trainwreck at worst (opinions vary, YMMV).

      Using native programming languages to Ubuntu/Linux (i.e. not Java) means that devs can build on their already existing apps for Ubuntu/Linux and not reinvent the wheel.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by akincer View Post
        Unless Canonical makes a strategic shift, you will NEVER be able to get one on a carrier subsidy. They are only making a limited number and will ship directly to consumers. This is your only guaranteed way to get one. They have indicated they MIGHT do this again in the future if the effort is successful, but no guarantees.
        Yeah, and I guess my point is that Canonical must make that shift. Otherwise they'll move from niche operating system for desktop to niche operating systems for phones.

        What they need is to get in partnership with Samsung, Motorola, etc and produce one phone that has this wonderful 'connect me to any monitor and you have a computer at your finger tips' functionality. Heck, the phone can be your input device in that scenario (and optionally a bluetooth physical keyboard added). Beautiful!

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        • #24
          Originally posted by mendieta View Post
          Yeah, and I guess my point is that Canonical must make that shift. Otherwise they'll move from niche operating system for desktop to niche operating systems for phones.

          What they need is to get in partnership with Samsung, Motorola, etc and produce one phone that has this wonderful 'connect me to any monitor and you have a computer at your finger tips' functionality. Heck, the phone can be your input device in that scenario (and optionally a bluetooth physical keyboard added). Beautiful!
          Maybe this is them testing the waters to making a major hardware play. Maybe not. If they take a page from Google and if this initiative is wildly successful then they'll continue down this path.

          I'm pretty sure they already ARE working with device manufacurers. I know they are at least talking with carriers who would in turn be talking to device manufacturers.

          I think their target niche is a growing number of users that only need desktop type computing a small percentage of the time and even then only for some pretty basic stuff (word processing, spreadsheets, basic photo/video editing, etc.) but use their phone the vast majority of the time as their computing device.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by DanLamb View Post
            Also, why doesn't Ubuntu push Java more for GUI app development? It seems that many of the best GUI apps, such as the super IDEs like IntelliJ and Eclipse, and even a few games (Minecraft, Wakfu) are Java-based? That seems like an ideal solution to the problems of desktop Linux GUI development.
            Well, QML also seems to fit well for that purpose. As for Java, I once read an interview with a developer from Electronic Arts (sorry, can't find a link anymore), suggesting that using Java today would probably the better way for this. However, in the games industry and among game devs, there are tons of tools all written in C/C++ which evolved over many years and still do, so porting them to Java would be too expensive, since it'd take ages before you could determine any benefit.

            As for the performance concerns, Java was bad in the 90's, but it got MUCH better (i.e. today it's widely used in HPC). The only spot, where it's still weak (and probably that one will remain) is startup time. But that's actually not that much of an issue. It doesn't hit the performance to an extent any user would notice. In fact, only when you're starting and closing such applications several times in a row and benchmark it, it really makes a difference - but such scenarios are very rare in the real world.

            Originally posted by akincer View Post
            The advantage is that you can have full device convergence. That's just marketing speak for "one device to be your desktop AND phone". So far, efforts to do this have been quite clumsy at best and total trainwreck at worst (opinions vary, YMMV).

            Using native programming languages to Ubuntu/Linux (i.e. not Java) means that devs can build on their already existing apps for Ubuntu/Linux and not reinvent the wheel.
            Well, Java is actually pretty good for achieving just that for all Platforms. The degree to which you can integrate such apps to the system's special features is sometimes limited, though.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by alexThunder View Post
              Well, Java is actually pretty good for achieving just that for all Platforms. The degree to which you can integrate such apps to the system's special features is sometimes limited, though.
              You must have missed the "build on existing apps" part. Hint: these apps are NOT written in Java and rewriting them in it is the very definition of reinventing the wheel.

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              • #27
                Wonder who is going to fund the huge gap in the funding. Either this will go down as a huge failure fur funding, or some one is going to pay the dividend to make things look like a success. But who will pay?

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by akincer View Post
                  The advantage is that you can have full device convergence. That's just marketing speak for "one device to be your desktop AND phone". So far, efforts to do this have been quite clumsy at best and total trainwreck at worst (opinions vary, YMMV).
                  Convergence is a total buzzword. There isn't even one benefit from using a smartphone as a desktop computer - none whatsoever. Everything you could do with such a setup, you could do better with a separate desktop computer + phone.

                  All that's really needed is a compact desktop computer with a dock to add your phone, where you can then sync the hard drives, browsers, etc. applications between the two devices. This would be a much better idea than somehow trying to use a smartphone CPU for desktop tasks.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by dee. View Post
                    Convergence is a total buzzword. There isn't even one benefit from using a smartphone as a desktop computer - none whatsoever. Everything you could do with such a setup, you could do better with a separate desktop computer + phone.

                    All that's really needed is a compact desktop computer with a dock to add your phone, where you can then sync the hard drives, browsers, etc. applications between the two devices. This would be a much better idea than somehow trying to use a smartphone CPU for desktop tasks.

                    you're right there is no benefit to using a smart phone as a desktop. Other than only having to buy and maintain a single computing device. And having your data always accessible without having to use the cloud or sync devices (did you forget to sync and now have conflicting versions?). There's also having all your apps with you at all times and being able to access them without having to digg your laptop out (because that is so much fun on a crowded plane).

                    Other than being completely wrong you are dead on.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by akincer View Post
                      You must have missed the "build on existing apps" part. Hint: these apps are NOT written in Java and rewriting them in it is the very definition of reinventing the wheel.
                      Which you can do on Android anyway so I'm not sure what point you're making...?

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