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Canonical Lowers Ubuntu Edge Pricing

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  • #11
    What is the advantage of running Ubuntu on a smartphone? I'm not trolling, just asking. Android seems way ahead of Ubuntu in terms of GUI functionality, while desktop Linux like Ubuntu seems way ahead in terms of the full command line ecosystem.

    Also, why doesn't Ubuntu push Java more for GUI app development? It seems that many of the best GUI apps, such as the super IDEs like IntelliJ and Eclipse, and even a few games (Minecraft, Wakfu) are Java-based? That seems like an ideal solution to the problems of desktop Linux GUI development.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by verde View Post
      Do you really believe that a smartphone with quad-core CPU, 128GB SSD and sapphire crystal screen protector that can run native Ubuntu OS if you dock it with mini HDMI cable will cost 300$ in the next 10 months?
      Easily, Nexus 4 is their demo device, it costs $299 with a BOM to be $157. In 10 months, maybe the cost of 128GB SSD and sapphire crystal screen protector can be included.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by LinuxGamer View Post
        it's going to be the ARM native Ubuntu OS
        You keep saying that like it's fact despite that not being affirmed as a fact. And before you pull out the "but Android!" bit, I've already sent you a link to Android builds running on Intel architecture. Do try to focus on facts instead of whatever butt hurt fantasy land you're living in.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by mendieta View Post
          I think the big elephant in the room is carrier subsidies. Most people expect to pay $100 or so upfront, and lock into a contract. I would love to get one of these phones when I renew my cellphone contract, but I wouldn't splurge on a $600 or higher purchase of a cellphone right now.
          Unless Canonical makes a strategic shift, you will NEVER be able to get one on a carrier subsidy. They are only making a limited number and will ship directly to consumers. This is your only guaranteed way to get one. They have indicated they MIGHT do this again in the future if the effort is successful, but no guarantees.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by [Knuckles] View Post
            Variable-pricing pricing campaigns are always harder, I think.
            It's hard not to feel cheated when you ask for a lot of money and then you discover you could have paid a significant amount less if you'd bought yesterday. I know I've been put off by other kickstarters doing that.
            The updated message says

            "If you contributed at the $830 Ubuntu Edge or $1,400 Double Edge levels before the new perks arrived, we’ll issue you a refund of the difference once the campaign is successful. If you’re happy with the amount you contributed, you can opt out of this refund by emailing us at indiegogoinfo@canonical.com."

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            • #16
              after they had sold the $600 phones the sales of the $830 were terrible, they only sold about 450 or so, they needed to sell about 50,000, they would have got past $9m at the slow rate of sales that they had. Adding this cheapER prices won't help, once the $625 and $675 phones have gone which total 2250 the same problem will arise. Ubuntu need to just sell all their remaining phones at $600-650 or they will not meet that $32m target and will therefore receive no money AT ALL. This would be incredibly embarrassing for canonical and would result in very few developers creating apps for ubuntu o.s as it will be seen as a very unpopular o.s.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by akincer View Post
                You keep saying that like it's fact despite that not being affirmed as a fact. And before you pull out the "but Android!" bit, I've already sent you a link to Android builds running on Intel architecture. Do try to focus on facts instead of whatever butt hurt fantasy land you're living in.
                this is what it is going to run on from the start http://www.ubuntu.com/phone/ubuntu-for-android

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by verde View Post
                  You again?

                  did you redo your hair?

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by LinuxGamer View Post
                    this is what it is going to run on from the start http://www.ubuntu.com/phone/ubuntu-for-android
                    You should probably read that page. You'll find interesting things like this:

                    "The hardware requirements are straightforward and, with a broad range of ARM and x86 hardware supported, it can realistically be added to phones already in development."

                    Aren't facts fun?

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      Originally posted by DanLamb View Post
                      What is the advantage of running Ubuntu on a smartphone? I'm not trolling, just asking. Android seems way ahead of Ubuntu in terms of GUI functionality, while desktop Linux like Ubuntu seems way ahead in terms of the full command line ecosystem.

                      Also, why doesn't Ubuntu push Java more for GUI app development? It seems that many of the best GUI apps, such as the super IDEs like IntelliJ and Eclipse, and even a few games (Minecraft, Wakfu) are Java-based? That seems like an ideal solution to the problems of desktop Linux GUI development.
                      Much nicer GUI and better system navigation (very personal, I especially like how the indicators work as I too often
                      need to open Androids system settings app and how you can quickly change apps as I ty to multi-task a lot).
                      Speed (much smoother animations and quicker response on the device I'm testing with (Galaxy Nexus).
                      Native C++ apps (also this for speed).

                      Java is better for bigger apps as it's easier to code and the downsides of the JVM isn't as noticeable
                      but on small apps like most phone apps the downsides of JVM (extra startup time, slower execution
                      until the JIT have wormed up, extra memory usage)
                      And on small devices like phones the Garbage Collector actually uses a noticeable part of the available
                      CPU cycles.

                      I like Java, together with Python that is the best language for coding but you have to know when your
                      favourite tool becomes a burden. If you know the size of the bolts head a fixed wrench is better than
                      a variable one

                      However Android still have the biggest advantage: available apps. If this device didn't have the ability
                      to multi-boot I wouldn't have "bought" it no matter how much better the system actually is (for me).

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