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Linux 3.2 Is Still Looking To Be Power Hungry

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  • #16
    Originally posted by del_diablo View Post
    cynyr: The vendors are not fixing it, so what are we suppose to do in the meantime?
    Edit your grub.conf, open a ticket with your distro, and/or call/write the support for your computer and ask them to fix it, carry a power cord or spare battery with you.

    I'm not a kernel dev, but I've seen this sort of thing before and the kernel almost always picks the spec and assumes the hardware doesn't lie. IDE HDs and if they are done writing, ACPI, hard drive sector size. Of course there are some work-arounds in the kernel the intel FPU bug comes to mind, and i'd bet a fair amount of the ALSA drivers as well.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by cynyr View Post
      Edit your grub.conf, open a ticket with your distro, and/or call/write the support for your computer and ask them to fix it, carry a power cord or spare battery with you.

      I'm not a kernel dev, but I've seen this sort of thing before and the kernel almost always picks the spec and assumes the hardware doesn't lie. IDE HDs and if they are done writing, ACPI, hard drive sector size. Of course there are some work-arounds in the kernel the intel FPU bug comes to mind, and i'd bet a fair amount of the ALSA drivers as well.
      That bug seems still opened
      monitored with the powertop running with ArchLinux 64 bits, Linux 3.1.x
      kworker threads display more than 60% of kernel wake-ups
      when the last is idling
      Btw, system is a Core i7 8 cores, speedstep, hyperthreading, C6 state, OC 3.2GHz, VTx, everythings activated

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      • #18
        I've been testing the it87 driver and noticed my Vcore was 1.08 instead of 0.96 when idle. (...) anything under 2.6 gives me 2.6, 2.6-3.1 GHz speeds work as expected. There is an unpassable floor at 2.6.
        Scary. Can someone else confirm this, or has that been fixed in 3.2 ?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by cynyr View Post
          Right but doesn't setting this to "on" when the hardware really doesn't support cause breakage?
          This is based on the original assumption of the problem, which turned out to be wrong. The kernel devs are now saying that they were misunderstanding the spec when they decided to turn it off the first time, and that it's actually OK to turn it on.

          The problem is ACPI, which is a poorly documented clusterfuck of a standard Intel created, and then they allowed Microsoft to twist the arms of motherboard manufacturers to use it as a tool to make it difficult to support various hardware with an x86 OS. There are famous emails subpoenaed from Bill Gates himself during the Microsoft anti-trust hearings in the 90s, discussing ways to use ACPI to sabotage Linux. It obviously worked, as we have these kind of bugs in the mainline kernel, because motherboard manufacturers won't reveal how their ACPI implementation works for fear of what the Microsoft mafia will do to them. Of course, nobody thinks to blame Microsoft or Intel for the problem, it must always be Linus' fault.

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